London, United Kingdom

By Russell Boyce

Global Editor, News Projects, Reuters Pictures

Two amazing pictures showed up on my screen over the past few days. The first was from Myanmar, where a Rohingya Muslim woman was pictured holding her malnourished twins. The second captured a deadly explosion in Iraq.

Both were sent out to our clients on the newswire, and I decided to share them on social media. First I posted them to Twitter, with links to Reuters.com slideshows and our Wider Image website. The people who follow us on Twitter know what to expect – breaking news pictures from around the globe including some images that are quite brutal.

Then I went to Instagram. I paused. Over the last few months, Reuters’ Instagram account has increased its following to almost 50,000. Each picture gets an average of over 1,000 likes and the numbers are growing.

We don’t force crop our pictures into squares and we never use the filters – what you see is an image just as it was moved to the wire, un-manipulated.

 A displaced Rohingya woman carries her severely malnourished twins in her lap in their house at the Dar Paing camp for internally displaced people in Sittwe, Rakhine state, April 24, 2014 REUTERS/Minzayar

We are continually told that Instagram is the platform of the future for picture-sharing and news photography. It’s a space Reuters needs to be in.