Photographers' Blog

After the deluge

Somerset, Britain

By Toby Melville

After a wet and windy December, in January it rained. And rained. And rained. And it kept on raining. Pretty much for the whole month in southern parts of Britain.

February was no better, bringing heavy storms and high winds. The extreme weather claimed a handful of lives, and flooded thousands of homes.

This wasn’t a disaster anywhere near the scale of the typhoon that hit the Philippines in 2013 or the Pakistan floods of 2010. It was nigh on negligible compared to the Indian Ocean tsunami of December 2004 where over 200,000 people died in one of the worst natural catastrophes of recent decades.

However, for a small island with a temperate climate on the eastern edge of the Atlantic Ocean (and a country where discussing the weather provides a common bond and safe opening gambit for conversation, possibly even more than debating football) the winter floods and rains were a huge event.

Not only did the floods leave some areas under water for more than a month, they also caused havoc for farmers, and disrupted business and transport links, even washing away part of a major train line. And the rain just seemed to keep on coming.

Standing in JFK’s shadow

By Brian Snyder

John F. Kennedy was born in Brookline, Massachusetts, and there are reminders of him all over Boston, the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, and New England. There’s the John F. Kennedy Presidential Library and Museum of course, but also the John F. Kennedy federal building, and many schools, streets, memorials and parks named after him. Kennedy also lived in Massachusetts, campaigned for Congress and Senate here, vacationed in Hyannis Port, Massachusetts and Newport, Rhode Island – and photographs of these events and many more are housed in his library. For the 50th anniversary of Kennedy’s assassination in Dallas in 1963, I culled some photographs from the museum’s archives, and set about finding the exact same scene today. Some of these photographs were made by the relatively well known White House photographers Cecil Stoughton and Robert Knudsen, while others are by anonymous photographers.

In order to match the modern scene to the old photographs, I made line drawings of the old photographs and printed those on clear plastic that I could tape to the display on the back of my camera to overlay the scene coming through my lens.

Many of the buildings and landmarks in the old images are still standing, offering clear reference points to line up. As I worked my way around the scenes, I figured out where the photographer had stood 50 or more years ago. The line-drawing overlays allowed me to approximate the focal length of the lens used in the old images, since none of the old images were shot on a 35mm camera. Once I had figured out the camera position and focal length of the lens, I could say to myself, “Cecil Stoughton, or Robert Knudsen, stood here.”

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