Caracas, Venezuela

By Jorge Silva

We came back home today, Monday, after four nights out, and my almost two-year-old daughter doesn’t understand why her toys and her teddy bears are not in her room.

Last Thursday, when I was awakened suddenly by  the sound of screaming and people banging on frying pans at 3:30 am, I knew it was going to be a complicated day. Another one, in the -so far- 3 months of protests.

The banging of pans and the screaming were a warning that the National Guard was arriving by surprise to break up a camp of protesters who oppose the government. They were camping one block and a half away from my house. I notified my coworkers.

I didn’t rush down to the street. I realized it wasn’t safe since the National Guard had set up a perimeter one block around the camp. Only when dawn started to break was I able to get to the top of a building with a view to the place where the soldiers were finishing cleaning up and taking away the remains of the camp. The protesters had already been arrested.

Venezuela's national guard dismantle an anti-government protester's camp site in front of UN offices at Chacao district in Caracas

We are always ready to go into hostile situations, or we are aware when we are heading into one, but we are not always ready to see the hostility reach our homes.