Photographers' Blog

Watching Libya from Malta

February 17, 2012

By Darrin Zammit Lupi

When the Arab Spring got underway late in 2010, few of us imagined it would spread to Libya with any tangible effect. To those of us of my generation here in Malta, Libyan leader Muammar Gaddafi was the bogeyman – he’d always been there lurking not too far from our shores – Libya is less than 350 km to the south of the island, and Gaddafi was a frequent visitor and close friend of the Maltese government in the 70s, my childhood years.

Nurse of the Mediterranean

September 16, 2011

Ever since the Libyan uprising began last February, the small Mediterranean island of Malta which I call home has been a vital cog in the vast humanitarian machine in operation. It started as an evacuation hub for thousands of people and then became a critical transit point for humanitarian aid. Several months later, Malta continues to play its part.

The rebel march to Tripoli

August 23, 2011

By Bob Strong

The Libyan rebel march to Tripoli – from the mountains to the coast

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In late July we pulled up to a Libyan rebel checkpoint outside the mountain town of Nalut and I got my first look at the fighting force. One rebel had his helmet on backwards, a few of them were armed with only knives, and random gunfire filled the air as men test fired their new weapons. It felt like the rebels couldn’t defeat a boy scout troop, much less Gaddafi’s well equipped army. As usual, I was dead wrong.

Waiting for Gaddafi

February 24, 2011

Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak (L) meets Libyan Leader Muammar Gaddafi at the Egyptian border city of Mersa Matrouh October 16, 1989.  REUTERS/Frederic Neema

It was 22 years ago and I was covering a meeting of the Libyan Leader Muammar Gaddafi and Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak in Egypt at the border town of Marsa Matrouh.

Libya’s Gaddafi takes center frame

September 23, 2009

The first day of the UN General Assembly is one of those days every year that you both look forward to and dread. With so many world leaders coming to New York to give a speech you know there will be always be news associated with the GA. The problem is very little changes at the UN from year to year and the pictures, of which thousands are shot every day, all tend to look very much the same.