Photographers' Blog

The last ten

By Jose Miguel Gomez

Some of these captives had been gone for 14 years, but as anxious as they must have been to return, they walked very slowly on the airport runway at Villavicencio. It seemed to me that they were carrying the weight of so many years of the horror they lived, hiking through the thick Colombian jungle, persecuted by the fear of being killed by their captors or by the bombing of the armed forces.

They landed exhausted. In their glances it seemed they were living a dream – one in which they returned to embrace their families, showing them that they were all still alive. Theirs was not an ending like some of their fellow captives, who were killed when the Army tried to free them. With their faces clearly aged, they returned with few possessions. Some of them brought jungle animals as pets. Their families awaited them in a private room of the airport because the government had decided not to show their first reunion to the press. We were upset, to say the least.

When Ingrid Betancourt and the 14 hostages were freed in Operation Checkmate, the government brought them to Bogota in a media show. This time the hostages were simple soldiers and policemen and the only thing they wanted to do was hug their children who had since grown into adults, and their spouses and parents affected by the years of suffering.

We awaited in the dense atmosphere of high heat and humidity on the airport tarmac as the choppers arrived and crews pushed the staircases into position. We were all wondering how the arrival of the 10 hostages would play out, imagining that their families would break the government’s security fence and rush to their missing loved ones, making this show their own and not another one belonging to the FARC.

As always, we were crammed into a rope corral after a very long wait for these last hostages to be released. It was a long day full of emotions, and of intense rain in the morning that forced a delay in the military helicopter from Brazil, the country that had mediated the release. Some journalists nodded off while others chatted, but we could feel the tension when the afternoon sun appeared clearly on its way to setting.

Routine hostage crisis turns deadly

ATTENTION: CONTAINS GRAPHIC CONTENT

By Erik de Castro

I arrived at the scene of the hostage taking in Manila with feelings of excitement because it was a big story. But also, with a pang of sadness as I was at exactly the same place two months ago when yellow was the color of festivities for thousands of people attending the inauguration of our new president, Benigno “NoyNoy” Aquino.

I immediately noticed a parked tourist bus just in front of the grandstand. I was standing behind a police line about 300 yards away. I quickly snapped photos of the bus and and two women looking out from between the closed curtain of the bus.

Tourists taken hostage look out from a window after a former police officer took hostage a tourist bus in Manila August 23, 2010.  REUTERS/Erik de Castro

My colleague Cheryl Ravelo and I set up our communications and our laptops to file pictures from my car. We immediately called Manila-based photographer Bobby Ranoco to arrange how we could get his memory cards to file the first Reuters pictures.