Photographers' Blog

More than cojones

Pamplona, Spain

By Vincent West

“Have we vanquished an enemy? None but ourselves.”

- George Mallory, mountaineer.

“I think about my mother,” says bullrunner Deirdre Carney.

“I don’t think a lot of men think about that. It might be a woman thing… Women think about the loved ones that will be harmed by them being harmed.”

U.S. runner Deirdre Carney (R) talks to veteran runner Joe Distler following the seventh running of the bulls of the San Fermin festival in Pamplona July 13, 2014. The festival, a heady mix of drinking, dancing, late nights and bullfights, made famous by Ernest Hemingway in his novel "The Sun Also Rises", runs for nine days until July 14. Four runners were hospitalized following the run that lasted two minutes and fifty-two seconds, according to local media. REUTERS/Vincent West (SPAIN - Tags: SOCIETY ANIMALS SPORT ATHLETICS)

Carney is talking about her thoughts before running with the bulls at Pamplona’s famous San Fermin festival, where being harmed is a definite possibility.

An ambulance service personnel tends to an injured female runner after she fell next to Miura fighting bulls at the entrance of the bullring during the final running of the bulls at the San Fermin festival in Pamplona July 14, 2014. A bull gored two men after breaking away from the pack and chasing them through the streets of Pamplona in the closing run of the San Fermin festival on Monday. REUTERS/Eloy Alonso (SPAIN - Tags: SOCIETY ANIMALS)

Several people were hospitalised during the event this year, one after being badly gored in the thigh by the 600 kg (1,323 lb) Victoriano del Rio fighting bull “Brevito”. 

A runner (partially obscured on L), is gored in the right thigh by the 600kg Victoriano del Rio fighting bull "Brevito" during the third running of the bulls at the San Fermin festival in Pamplona July 9, 2014. This runner was identified by the website sanfermin.com as Bill Hillman, co-author with John Hemingway, of the book "How to Survive the Running of the Bulls". The 32-year-old American, from Chicago, was gored in the thigh, a doctor told Spanish state television. REUTERS/Eloy Alonso (SPAIN - Tags: SOCIETY ANIMALS TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY)

Fourteen people have died over the course of the last century at San Fermin and it is commonplace for runners to be hurt by being trampled, gored or crushed.

“I wake up terrified,” says Carney. “You have to control your panic and your fear and then you get down there and do it and the pay-off is quite incredible.”

Documenting a graphic goring

Pamplona, Spain

By Susana Vera

There are two types of bull run photographers, those who happen to be where the gorings take place and those who don’t. I used to belong to the second group, but that changed on July 12 when a 31-year-old man from Castellon, eastern Spain, was gored three times almost underneath the balcony where I was shooting from during Pamplona’s world-famous San Fermin festival.

I had slept pretty badly the previous night. I never get much sleep throughout the festival anyhow, because I end up going to bed late and waking up very early to grab a spot along the route of the bull run. There are tons of photographers, both local and foreign, at every post of the fence and it’s not easy to find a good place after 6.30 a.m. even if the bull run doesn’t start for another 90 minutes. Luckily that day I was in no hurry, though. I had arranged with my cousin Amalia to shoot the running of the bulls from my uncle’s dentist clinic. Its highly coveted balconies face Estafeta street, a prime spot to see the runners sprint alongside the bulls during the morning “encierro”, which takes place at 8 a.m. every day from July 7th until July 14th.

I was born in Pamplona and even though I moved away at the age of 22, most of my family still reside there. My mother was born and raised in the same building where her father had his dental practice and where my uncle has his nowadays. They both grew up watching the bull runs from the same balcony from which I took the photo of Diego Miralles getting gored by an El Pilar fighting bull named “Langostero”. I have been going to that very same balcony once every San Fermin festival since 2005, when I first started photographing the running of the bulls, but I had never documented such a terrifying moment before.

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