Photographers' Blog

Nobel prize winner in exclusive photos

Brussels, Belgium

By Yves Herman

The announcement of the 2013 Nobel Prize in Physics was due at 0945 GMT. Belgian physicist Francois Englert was among the potential winners for this year. Englert, together with Britain’s Peter Higgs, were nominated for predicting the existence of the Higgs boson – the particle key to explaining why elementary matter has mass.

Together with Reuters television, who were looking to film exclusive reaction of the winner, we decided to research where Englert might be at the time of the announcement. Aided by our colleague Francois Lenoir, who photographed him at his home last year, we finally found Englert’s family apartment in Uccle, southern Brussels. We decided to take a chance to meet him as soon as possible to capture his initial reaction, if it happened that the Higgs boson won the prestigious prize.

We were almost certain that he would be at home but upon arriving in Uccle, we tried to meet him for an interview but were not successful. He was indeed at home but did not want to make any comment before the announcement by the Nobel Prize committee.

In the meantime, Higgs, the colleague of Professor Englert remained discreet and nobody knew where he was even up until a few minutes before the announcement.

At 0945 GMT, I was the only photographer outside Englert’s apartment as his shadow appeared from time to time through the window.

A sheep with an artificial heart – or maybe not

Tianjin municipality, China

By Petar Kujundzic

I took a trip to the port city of Tianjin after China Central Television (CCTV) reported on a sheep with an artificial heart developed at TEDA International Cardiovascular Hospital. According to CCTV, the hospital recently unveiled a new artificial heart, which was implanted in a sheep two months ago. The sheep lived healthily for more than 62 days, a new record among similar experiments in the country.

This sounded like a very good reason to leave Beijing for a day and report about such an extraordinary achievement. Upon arrival we met the hospital’s administration director who told us that this was not really an artificial heart but a ventricular assistant device (VAD), which is basically a mechanical pump that’s used to support the heart’s function and blood flow in people who have weakened hearts. He didn’t know why CCTV had reported differently.

After being disappointed for a couple of minutes we decided not to go back empty-handed, so they took us to a low-rise building next to the hospital where the star of the experiment was located, a ram nicknamed Tianjiu (Everlasting). The three-year-old ram carried a VAD, which was designed by the hospital to enhance cardiac pumping by using magnetic suspension technologies from state-of-the-art aerospace science.

Mars in the desert

Outside Hanksville, Utah

By Jim Urquhart

I may be a Red Shirt but I made it to Mars.

According to Urban Dictionary (the finest source of American literature), a Red Shirt is defined as; A character in a science fiction or adventure story whose sole dramatic purpose is to get killed by the story’s villain and/or itinerant monster. Taken from the propensity of security officers on the original Star Trek series (who typically wore red uniform tops) to be killed in the episodes’ pre-opening-credits teasers.

GALLERY: LIFE ON MARS

When I was young I wanted to be an astronaut but I never had the discipline to follow through. At one point I wanted to be a scientist but I barely made it out of high school and later dropped out of college but not until after I learned a little chemistry for recreational use in my younger days.

Even with my Red Shirts I have always been wanted to be around people that put their minds and bodies to the test. I even married a woman that has three Master’s degrees and is working on her Ph. D. I have always prided myself in consuming as much science news as possible. To me, the mind and the search for tangible knowledge is the fuel for dreams and will lead you to adventures in life.

Lost in collisions at the CERN

By Denis Balibouse

A big part of being a news photographer is doing research. Not just the search for themes or events to cover but also finding enough information before an event so that we are able to cover it correctly. Taking a photo is often one of the last things I do in a long job.

If there’s one subject I have trouble understanding, despite almost 10 years covering it, it’s the search for the Higgs boson in the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), the world’s largest and highest-energy particle accelerator at the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN) in Geneva. When it comes to CERN, I often find myself “lost in collisions”.

I first took photographs at CERN in September 2004, a few years after digging commenced for the 27km-long (17 miles) tunnel of the LHC. I went to a site in France where CERN was celebrating its 50th anniversary by pointing beams to the night sky to give those of us on the ground an idea about the size of the ring. I could only get five out of the 24 beams in my photo, as it was so gigantic.