Gingrich reiterates plan to hire poor kids as school janitors

December 1, 2011

Speaking in Iowa today, Republican frontrunner Newt Gingrich repeated his idea for schoolkids in poor neighborhoods to take over some of the jobs adults are normally employed to do — greeter, for instance, or assistant librarian or janitor — in exchange for cash and, apparently, lessons in work ethic.

Gingrich, who according to a new national poll is leading 38 percent to Mitt Romney’s 17 percent among Republicans, offered no evidence to back up his claim that “really poor children in really poor neighborhoods have no habits of working and have nobody around them who works.” These children, he said, “have no habit of showing up on Monday; they have no habit of staying all day; they have no habit of ‘I do this and you give me cash’ — unless it’s illegal.”

Here’s the clip, via CBS News:

Credit: CBS News

Comments

Newt, obviously, sees mid-western America as a great place to play the race card, but after sending the middle class jobs to China he wants to give what jobs are left to child labor.

Posted by gobucks | Report as abusive
 

This guy is is really something…

Posted by fromthecenter | Report as abusive
 

Allowing poor kids an opportunity to work as school Janitors is a really good idea. They won’t be forced to do it, but will be given a chance to earn money, and at the same time learn the value of working to get ahead, and contributing to society. I think anyone who gets elected should do this.

Posted by MBIAJC | Report as abusive
 

So now the poor are not just all lazy and stupid, they’re all criminals too…

Posted by 4ngry4merican | Report as abusive
 

Newt is a freaking puppet for special interests. Take one his his kids and put him to work raking my yard. See how long this moron puts up with that. What a hypocritical turd.

Posted by patrickjihad | Report as abusive
 

I do not like Newt, but really, should it be so controversial that we suggest poor kids be given the opportunity to work to earn something of value? I worked through out high school and college. I was poor and I knew it. I was determined to get out of poverty. Work was a great teacher of what the real world was like and what one might do if you were willing to work. I now am a semi retired attorney and very well off. Work as a youth taught me many great lessons, not the least of which was if you want anything better than being poor you will have to work for it. Work was not a four letter word. It was a great teacher that lead to success.

Posted by onemind | Report as abusive
 

As an outsider looking in, I really cant believe that this is the type of candidate that the US media are actually rooting for to get the Republican nomination. Romney and Perry are not much better, just more of the same for the US. Im not confident that any of them would manage to knock Obama out of office. There is only one person in the Republican race that has the American people’s interests at heart and that’s the guy who seldom gets a mention in US mainstream media and yet still manages to poll well. Yep, thats Ron Paul. I guess the yanks are again just too caught up in the hype to realise what a basket case they’ve made of things.

Posted by Alonegunman | Report as abusive
 

Good idea putting nine year olds to work, Newt. Let’s focus on finding places for kids to work in coal mines, the textile and garment industries, picking crops, etc. Before long we’ll be back in the good old days all over again (Hey, we’re busting unions anyhow, ain’t we?)

Posted by gangof4 | Report as abusive
 

Gingrich says ‘poor kids have no habit of work.’

Unlike Paris Hilton who had to work hard for her fortunes :)

Posted by AlkalineState | Report as abusive
 

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