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Oct 30, 2014

Book Talk: Black music, white culture and a legendary U.S. highway

BOSTON, Oct 30 (Reuters) – Author Dennis McNally accompanied
the Grateful Dead as a publicist and historian on the band’s
“long strange trip,” and he chronicled Jack Kerouac, the Beat
Generation author of “On the Road.”

For his latest book, “On Highway 61: Music, Race and the
Evolution of Cultural Freedom,” McNally twice drove every mile
of U.S. Route 61, the legendary Mississippi River road, to
document the influence of black music on white America.

Oct 16, 2014

Novelist Dubus now looks homeward after gritty memoir

By Randall Mikkelsen

NEWBURY Mass. (Reuters) – Andre Dubus III put his faded hometown of Haverhill, Massachusetts, on the map of modern literature with his gritty memoir, “Townie.”

But Dubus’ native New England did not find a setting in his fiction until he published a collection of novellas, “Dirty Love,” which depicts small-city and shore-town residents in messy quests for human relationships.

Oct 16, 2014

Book Talk: Novelist Dubus now looks homeward after gritty memoir

By Randall Mikkelsen

NEWBURY Mass. (Reuters) – Andre Dubus III put his faded hometown of Haverhill, Massachusetts, on the map of modern literature with his gritty memoir, “Townie.”

But Dubus’ native New England did not find a setting in his fiction until he published a collection of novellas, “Dirty Love,” which depicts small-city and shore-town residents in messy quests for human relationships.

Oct 3, 2014
via Financial Regulatory Forum

Bankers say “derisking” underway amid sanctions crackdown; that’s the point, U.S. regulator says

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A process of “derisking” is underway by financial firms exiting sectors that represent compliance landmines, bankers said on Tuesday, but a top U.S. sanctions enforcer said that is sometimes just the right move.

“It is not at all uncommon for me to hear that a compliance overhaul was done and certain customers, certain lines of activity were deemed too risky to persist. That may be exactly the right response to a situation where the risk outweighs the benefit,” said Adam Szubin, director of the U.S. Treasury’s Office of Foreign Assets Control (OFAC), the lead agency for the enforcement of U.S. financial sanctions.

Jul 23, 2014
Jul 21, 2014
Jul 21, 2014
Jun 19, 2014
via Financial Regulatory Forum

BNP’s ‘huge’ role in undermining U.S. Sudan sanctions behind looming tough penalty, sources say

By Brett Wolf, Compliance Complete ST. LOUIS, June 18 – The pivotal role BNP Paribas played in helping Sudan sell oil in violation of U.S. sanctions is the major reason U.S. authorities are pushing for harsh penalties against the French banking giant, two sources with firsthand knowledge of the matter said.”BNP basically was the Sudanese economy. They were just huge in helping the government of Sudan evade U.S. sanctions,” one of the sources said.BNP’s role involved removing references to Sudanese parties from wire-transfer messages, so U.S. dollar oil payments could clear through New York and move into accounts controlled by Khartoum, the sources said. The sources declined to name the buyers of the Sudanese oil or to say what Khartoum did with the revenue.

The dollar is the primary currency for the global oil trade.

The prohibited transactions ran into the “many billions of dollars,” and their “sheer volume” weakened the U.S. sanctions from 2002 and “well beyond 2009,” the other source said. He added that the sums involved and the damage to sanctions “factored into the mix” as authorities calculated the approximate size of the penalty that would be demanded from the bank.

May 29, 2014

Pearl S. Buck’s last novel, a ‘crypto-autobiography’

BOSTON (Reuters) – It is hard to imagine a China so remote in Western imagination that a single American writer could serve as one of the few popular translators of its culture.

But that was a status Pearl S. Buck carried after her 1931 novel “The Good Earth” launched a prolific career that made her a global celebrity. She won a Pulitzer prize for the book, and a Nobel prize in 1938 for the body of her work.

May 8, 2014

Pearl S. Buck’s last novel, a ‘crypto-autobiography’

BOSTON (Reuters) – It is hard to imagine a China so remote in Western imagination that a single American writer could serve as one of the few popular translators of its culture.

But that was a status Pearl S. Buck carried after her 1931 novel “The Good Earth” launched a prolific career that made her a global celebrity. She won a Pulitzer prize for the book, and a Nobel prize in 1938 for the body of her work.