Editor, Global Regulatory Briefing
Randall's Feed
Jul 20, 2011
via Financial Regulatory Forum

Ratings agencies turn tables on global legislators

By Christopher Elias

London, July 20 (Business Law Currents) – Governments around the world may regret the vitriol they cast at rating agencies as these American companies turn the tables on sovereign debt-marred governments and drive the agenda in the U.S. and EU.

Turning the hunted into the hunters, rating agencies have taken aim at political decisions in the U.S. and Europe as they constrain political decisions and break free from the much-promised legislative clampdown to impact euro zone restructurings and U.S. debt ceiling considerations.

Jun 15, 2011
via Financial Regulatory Forum

A letter to JPMorgan: Dimon is wrong -COLUMN

By Anat Admati, guest columnist. The views expressed are her own

PALO ALTO, California, June 15 (Thomson Reuters Accelus) -

Dear JPMorgan Chase Directors

I own some JPMorgan Chase (JPM) shares through mutual funds in my retirement account. I have read Mr. Dimon’s recent letter to shareholders and some of his public comments. I write to urge you to reconsider JPM’s actions related to capital regulation. For the overall economy, as well as for JPM, these actions are misguided.

May 18, 2011
via Financial Regulatory Forum

The Rajaratnam Verdict: Tip of the Iceberg – ANALYSIS

NEW YORK, May 18 (Business Law Currents) – The U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission’s trophy case gets a new addition with the conviction of Raj Rajaratnam, but shelf room is still available.

For all its publicity, the Rajaratnam case was merely one of many; since late 2009, insider trading probes related to Galleon have resulted in 13 additional guilty pleas. In recent months, some of the country’s most prestigious names have been linked to what appears to be a widening net of scandals. Fallout from these and others yet to be named should continue to generate headlines for the foreseeable future.

May 13, 2011
via Financial Regulatory Forum

COLUMN: British bankers give up payment-protection appeal – the implications

By Adam Samuel, Thomson Reuters Accelus contributor. The opinions expressed are his own.

LONDON, May 13 (Thomson Reuters Accelus) – The British Bankers’ Association left it until the day before the last available one to appeal against its defeat in the Administrative Court, to throw in the towel in its payment protection insurance judicial review application.

May 10, 2011
via Financial Regulatory Forum

Is the Financial Stability Board the regulator to rule them all?

By Susannah Hammond, Thomson Reuters’  regulatory intelligence team. The views expressed are her own

LONDON, May 9 (Thomson Reuters Accelus) – The Financial Stability Board, regulatory policy maker of choice for the G20, has started to show its teeth. From its roots as the supranational setter of standards, guidance, policies and principles in the wake of the financial crisis, the FSB has started to clarify how it will monitor compliance with its requirements as well as deal forcefully with breaches.

May 9, 2011
via Financial Regulatory Forum

U.S. insider cases reshape policy for U.S. companies, enforcers

Photo

By Erik Krusch

NEW YORK  (Business Law Currents) Inside information seems to be making its way out of the office and boardroom and onto the Street where it is parlayed into lucrative stock trades. From former hedge fund mogul Raj Rajaratnam to erstwhile Berkshire Hathaway executive and reputed Warren Buffett successor David Sokol, individuals alleged to have traded on inside information are sweating in the proverbial hot seat.

Rajaratnam’s alleged violation of insider trading laws and Sokol’s alleged violation of Berkshire policy, and possibly state and federal law, are helping to shape current market norms and the future behavior of investors in U.S. capital markets. These corporate dramas are unfolding before our very eyes and today’s events offer a possible window into what post-Sokol and Rajaratnam corporate policy and insider trading enforcement may look like.

May 4, 2011
via Financial Regulatory Forum

U.S. chases elusive currency-detection technology

By Brett Wolf

ST. LOUIS, May 4 (Thomson Reuters Accelus) – To combat money laundering and contain the drug war raging along the U.S.-Mexico border, U.S. authorities are seeking technology that can detect the hoards of cash that smugglers try to spirit abroad.

But as results come in on initial development efforts, it is uncertain whether the technology is within reach.

Nov 23, 2010
via Financial Regulatory Forum

FACTBOX-CFTC to-do list for implementing reforms

Nov 22 (Reuters) – The U.S. Commodity Futures Trading Commission faces the mammoth task of writing detailed regulations to implement reforms passed by Congress giving the agency oversight of the $600 trillion over-the-counter derivatives market.

Working from a list of 30 topic areas, the agency may end up writing 50 to 60 regulations, CFTC Chairman Gary Gensler has said.

Sep 27, 2010
via Financial Regulatory Forum

FACTBOX-How the EU plans to shake up financial services

Sept 27 (Reuters) – European Union central bankers, lawmakers and ministers meet in Brussels this week for the annual Eurofi symposium to discuss the bloc’s financial reform plans.

Representatives of European Union states and the European Parliament also meet separately on Monday in a further bid to agree new rules to regulate managers of hedge funds and private equity groups.

Sep 15, 2010
via Financial Regulatory Forum

ANALYSIS-EU, U.S. supervisors face derivatives test

By Huw Jones

LONDON, Sept 15 (Reuters) – Differences between new European Union and U.S. rules to crackdown on derivatives will be a key test of how well transatlantic regulators can coordinate to iron out loopholes banks may be tempted to exploit.

The United States has already approved a law to tighten supervision of the $615 trillion off-exchange derivatives markets and the EU published its own draft law on Wednesday.