Comments on: How computerized work affects immigration http://blogs.reuters.com/reihan-salam/2013/07/19/how-computerized-work-affects-immigration/ Wed, 30 Jul 2014 19:10:25 +0000 hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=4.2.5 By: Syanis http://blogs.reuters.com/reihan-salam/2013/07/19/how-computerized-work-affects-immigration/#comment-573 Wed, 24 Jul 2013 05:44:59 +0000 http://blogs.reuters.com/reihan-salam/?p=319#comment-573 Problem with allowing illegal aliens to gain legal status is they will NOT be in the fields doing that work. They will be taking core jobs that Americans will do. Problem with allowing them *rights* and *protections* from getting kicked out also gives them balls to challenge the country for giving them more. They don’t want to pick crops and neither do their children. But if that’s what the country needs we can do so through strict enforcement and NO benefits to illegal aliens with a solid agricultural visa system that doesn’t allow them to stay, only seasonal.

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By: OneOfTheSheep http://blogs.reuters.com/reihan-salam/2013/07/19/how-computerized-work-affects-immigration/#comment-571 Tue, 23 Jul 2013 07:20:57 +0000 http://blogs.reuters.com/reihan-salam/?p=319#comment-571 @JL4,

“I think if we gave “meaningful” tax breaks to corporations for hiring American citizens (in the U.S. or outside it) we’d see the job market…shoot through the roof.” If we use the word “businesses”, I agree.

“The drivers of the U.S. economy, Congress and Corporations, don’t want to spread Democracy, they want to spread capitalism.” Uhhh, no. Capitalism and profit are the drivers of prosperity for the U.S. economy and world wide.

It spreads like a weed all by itself, even to Red China. It is so powerful it can transform any country and works well in many “harnesses”.

There is nothing horrible about “foreign markets” learning to fish in America’s economy to improve their people’s lives and standard of living. I am confident that Americans enjoy sufficient advantages in capital, education and, in particular, innovation that America can compete on a world stage where the “best and brightest” of other countries lift more and more out of dead end poverty.

Is it not better for China to make things Americans will buy than return to the 1950’s when their only “way forward” was as Russia’s pawn in Korea providing cannon fodder and munitions? In real life we don’t choose between lovely dreams, but from real alternatives; none perfect.

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By: JL4 http://blogs.reuters.com/reihan-salam/2013/07/19/how-computerized-work-affects-immigration/#comment-570 Mon, 22 Jul 2013 15:47:42 +0000 http://blogs.reuters.com/reihan-salam/?p=319#comment-570 Chauffeurs….really? Yeah. That’s my dream – to have someone from a third world country drive me to the dentist. That’s an absurd example. Why would we want to “import” low-wage drivers, or low-wage anybody?

The mechanization of farming shuts everyone out of low-skilled, low-wage jobs – Americans, too. But in the end it will be cheaper for the farmers and keep the price of lettuce low. Heaven forbid I pay .56 more for a head of lettuce.

AdamSmith, I don’t think it’s as much immigration, illegal or otherwise, that is the immediate threat. I think it’s Globalization – the importing and exporting of low-skilled workers and middle-class jobs, respectively, and all so that the corporations can keep their costs low, lower and lowest – at the expense of the average, middle-class Americans.

The problem is Congress is giving corporations tax breaks every time we turn around. I think if we gave *meaningful* tax breaks to corporations for hiring American citizens (in the U.S. or outside it) we’d see the job market, and thus the middle-class, shoot through the roof.

The drivers of the U.S. economy, Congress and Corporations, don’t want to spread Democracy, they want to spread capitalism. There is nothing horrible about wanting to go into foreign markets unless it is at the expense of our own.

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By: AdamSmith http://blogs.reuters.com/reihan-salam/2013/07/19/how-computerized-work-affects-immigration/#comment-566 Fri, 19 Jul 2013 20:25:19 +0000 http://blogs.reuters.com/reihan-salam/?p=319#comment-566 @tmc – Your comment is well taken.

But remember history, brutal as it is, shows over and over that life is a jungle. Hitler is one example, Napoleon is another, and the “globalization” of today a third example. All a jungle, as Darwin explained.

I’m of the opinion now that Americans must begin to stick together immediately, today, or we’ll be soon overwhelmed by the rest of the world.

Now I realize, belatedly, that even though I’m an American engineer and not an American agricultural laborer, I must look out for my fellow American, whether he’s educated or uneducated. If I let the world eat him, the American agricultural worker, alive, and devour his family, then it harms America as a society, and thus harms me.

Immigration is an immediate exigent threat destroying the American middle class now, this week.

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By: tmc http://blogs.reuters.com/reihan-salam/2013/07/19/how-computerized-work-affects-immigration/#comment-565 Fri, 19 Jul 2013 18:34:45 +0000 http://blogs.reuters.com/reihan-salam/?p=319#comment-565 Great article! Well Done.
Sorry @AdamSmith, the Tomato comparison doesn’t hold water. But I do agree that we should reduce, not increase all forms of immigration right now. I think the author is pointing that out pretty well.

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By: AdamSmith http://blogs.reuters.com/reihan-salam/2013/07/19/how-computerized-work-affects-immigration/#comment-564 Fri, 19 Jul 2013 17:37:30 +0000 http://blogs.reuters.com/reihan-salam/?p=319#comment-564 Educating Americans will do no good if America does not defend itself against the huge wave of immigration, both legal and illegal, the is currently invading every American neighborhood.

There are thousands of highly educated American engineers, the best of the best, with the very latest hottest skillset, who are seeing their wage rate plummet, and are seeing Indian immigrants sitting in the cubicles next to them.

The H1B visa program has destroyed the American middle class.

It’s really a simple case of supply and demand. Consider an analogy. Consider, for example, what would happen if H1B were applied to plumbers instead of engineers.

Pick any city, let’s say, Denver, Colorado. Now, bring in 100 busloads of freshly graduated Indian or Chinese plumbers (4,000 new plumbers), who want to enter into the plumbing business in Denver, and make a living.

The result? Wage rates for plumbers will become depressed. The existing 960 American plumbers in Denver, once busy every day, and making a good living, will now have much less work, or no work at all.

All the Denver highschool kids hear from their fathers and uncles that plumbing is no longer a good way to make a living. The plumber wages are going down, down, down. In droves, they choose some other path in life. Who can compete with improverished hordes of plumbers from India who will work for any price? India has 1.17 BILLION people, and many of them are coming here, flooding our labor markets.

The H1B visa law was created, written and lobbied for by large American corporations as a means for decreasing their engineering labor costs. Indeed their corporate profits have zoomed up, up, up — while the wage rates paid to their American engineers have gone down, down, down.

This is what the H1B visa has done to the American engineering profession. H1B has already brought in over one million foreign engineers to America, thus driving down American wage rates, and discouraging American kids from majoring in engineering.

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By: AdamSmith http://blogs.reuters.com/reihan-salam/2013/07/19/how-computerized-work-affects-immigration/#comment-563 Fri, 19 Jul 2013 17:30:24 +0000 http://blogs.reuters.com/reihan-salam/?p=319#comment-563 Take any agricultural crop, for example tomatoes.

Growing tomatoes entails many EXPENSES:

– Capital to acquire or own the land. Or leasing expense to rent the land.
– Seeds expense
– Fertilizer expense
– Chemicals expense: Herbicides, insecticides, fungicides, nutritionals.
– Water expense
– Irrigation equipment expense
– Heavy equipment expense
– Management and executive salary expense
– Crop testing expense
– Marketing expense
– Brokerage commission expense
– Transportation expense
– Farm labor expense

The last item, farm labor expense is but a tiny part of the cost of delivering tomatoes to the grocery shelf.

If American ag corporations were to pay tomato harvesters $30/hour instead of $8/hour, the price of tomatoes at the grocer, currently about $2.99/pound would barely be affected.

Yet this article continues the lie, the propaganda, that if agricultural corporations were to pay good, high wages to farm laborers, America could not afford it. That is big money propaganda.

Before the great wave of illegal immigration that started in about 1990, tomato farm laborers were Americans, not immigrants. Yes, tomatoes were harvested by hard-working, good Americans.

And the price of tomatoes at the grocery shelf was a very good bargain for the American consumer.

This article is just another propaganda piece fed to the media by the public relations organizations hired by big agriculture and big money to sway public opinion in this run up to pass the immigration amnesty currently before Congress.

The truth is that the current massive immigration into the USA is destroying the American middle class, who are seeing their wages plummet, their jobs disappear, and their families destroyed.

While the wealthy grow richer with each immigrant that arrives, whether from Mexico, China, India, Philippines, Indonesia, Nigeria or Somalia. Because each new immigrant will occupy an apartment or house, driving up rents for everybody and making the landlords richer.

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By: OneOfTheSheep http://blogs.reuters.com/reihan-salam/2013/07/19/how-computerized-work-affects-immigration/#comment-562 Fri, 19 Jul 2013 16:57:18 +0000 http://blogs.reuters.com/reihan-salam/?p=319#comment-562 Excellent, incisive article.

“…is now the ideal time to welcome a new wave of less-skilled immigrants, many of whom will struggle to adapt as computerized work continues to spread?”

Considering the ever-increasing number of American citizens being idled by “computerized work”, ABSOLUTELY NOT!

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