Reihan Salam

GOP: Beyond repealing to reforming

By Reihan Salam
February 17, 2014

The last time the federal government approached its statutory debt limit, Republicans in the House of Representatives fought tooth and nail to attach tough conditions to any increase. On Tuesday, House Speaker John Boehner (R-Ohio) shepherded a “clean” debt limit increase through that barely raised an eyebrow.

Where is the GOP heading on immigration reform?

By Reihan Salam
January 17, 2014

After falling off the radar for months, immigration reform is back. Late last year, Speaker John Boehner hired Rebecca Tallent — a veteran of Arizona Sen. John McCain’s efforts to offer a path to citizenship to large numbers of unauthorized immigrants — as one of his senior staffers. That decision strongly suggested that the GOP was on the verge of making a big immigration push. Laura Meckler and Kristina Peterson of the Wall Street Journal report that the Republican leadership is gravitating towards granting unauthorized immigrants provisional legal status that will give them the right to live and work in the United States, and that immigrants granted provisional status will eventually be allowed to apply for a green card.

After Obamacare glitches, the case for default insurance

By Reihan Salam
October 25, 2013

The Obamacare debate is entering a new phase. The problems plaguing the insurance exchanges have raised serious questions about the viability of the president’s health reform effort. The Obama administration and its allies insist that the exchanges will soon be up and running, and that they’ve already been successful. Yet at least some liberals are starting to wonder if the exchange model should be abandoned in favor of a single-payer, Medicare-for-all approach. John Cassidy of the New Yorker, an occasional Obamacare critic from the left, is just one of many liberals who’ve touted the virtues of a single-payer system, and it is easy to imagine future Democratic presidential candidates doing the same. Conservatives, meanwhile, have tended to characterize the failure of the exchanges as a reflection of the limits of government. Patrick Ruffini, a well-regarded conservative strategist, captured the views of many on the right in a short piece titled “How Healthcare.gov Discredits Liberalism.” We’re nowhere near a consensus on whether the kludgy mess that is Obamacare ought to be replaced. But serious questions are being raised across the political spectrum.

How to fix the GOP’s discipline problem

By Reihan Salam
October 4, 2013

As the government shutdown grinds on, the Republican leadership in the House is struggling to unite GOP lawmakers around a fiscal deal that Senate Democrats and the Obama administration would be willing to accept. Speaker John Boehner has reportedly said that he is willing to rely on Democratic votes if necessary to pass an increase in the debt ceiling. Yet he also insists that he will fight for spending cuts and entitlement reform in any debt ceiling bill, in a nod to conservative members who are convinced that he is eager to sell them out.

Obamacare’s threat to healthcare innovation

By Reihan Salam
September 27, 2013

Next week, the new state-based health insurance exchanges established under the Affordable Care Act, better known as Obamacare, will be open for business. Or rather — some of them will be sort of open for business, as the exchanges have been plagued by a series of technical glitches and delays. The Obama administration is now characterizing October 1st as the beginning of a “soft launch,” during which federal and state officials will work out various kinks. And though this might sound like just another bureaucratic foul-up, the success of the exchanges in these first few months will have enormous implications for the ultimate success of Obamacare.

Obamacare’s sliding scales and slippery slopes

By Reihan Salam
July 8, 2013

Last week as Americans celebrated Independence Day, the Obama administration made a pair of big announcements about the Affordable Care Act (ACA), the crown jewel of the president’s domestic policy efforts: two of the ACA’s key enforcement provisions—income verification and a mandate for employers to provide healthcare—are being delayed until 2015. The exchanges will still open and subsidies will flow in 2014, but efforts to ferret out fraud, or for that matter honest mistakes, will be put on hold. Reading between the lines, it seems as though the White House was acknowledging that the health system created by the ACA is unworkable in its current form.

For states, Washington’s budgetary seduction proves too hard to resist

By Reihan Salam
February 6, 2013

Federalism’s days appear to be numbered. The reason isn’t so much that the power of the federal government has increased, though that’s part of it. Instead, the slow-motion death of federalism flows from the fact that a wide array of federal programs have seduced state governments into playing Washington’s tune.