DealZone

Back off InBev, or the Clydesdale gets it

June 16, 2008

Broadcaster Al Hrabosky raises a stuffed Clydesdale during remarks at the “Save AB” rally (St Louis Post-Dispatch)InBev‘s $46 billion bid for Anheuser-Busch is stirring up some Budweiser pride in the brewer’s home tome of St Louis, Missouri. The St. Louis Post-Dispatch reported that a crowd of about 100 demonstrators marched this weekend, chanting “Hell no, Bud won’t go.”

Some wore “This Bud’s for U.S.A.” T-shirts, perhaps not surprising since Anheuser-Busch spends about $475 million each year on ads that often tout Budweiser as “America’s Beer.” Rally attendee Dave White promised that he would never let a drop of Bud pass his lips if InBev, the Belgian brewing giant, was successful in its takeover bid.

“I’m not a Miller guy, so I’ll have to go with micro beers or brew my own,” he told the Post-Dispatch.

It was unclear if the people at the Budweiser rally, aimed at keeping the hometown brewery from “falling into foreign hands,” were aware of the brand’s tangled roots. “Budweiser” originally designated a resident of the Bohemian town of Budweis, part of the Czech Republic. The trademark has been in dispute since the early 20th century, due to the existence of a Bohemian brewery called Budweiser-Budvar.

As a result, Anheuser-Busch sells its flagship beer as “Bud” in France and other countries, and as “Anheuser-Busch B” in Germany. The Czech beer is sold as “Czechvar” in the United States and Canada.

Back to the protesters — they’ve set up a website, saveab.com, with an online petition where concerned citizens including Missouri Gov. Matt Blunt have committed to “joining the effort to keep Anheuser-Busch owned and operated right here in America.” Also featured is a parody Budweiser ad from a local radio station:

“It’s a condiment to the American life: A beer and a hot dog, a beer and peanuts. You Belgian guys? What do you have to offer: Beer and a waffle — won’t that taste great?”

(Photo: Teresa Prince, St Louis Post-Dispatch)

Comments
3 comments so far | RSS Comments RSS

You quote a consumer commenting that maybe a switch to Miller could be considered (in response to A-B falling to foreign ownership), yet you make no reference to the fact that Miller is actually owned by South African Breweries and that Coors merged with Canada’s Molson.

Posted by Jon | Report as abusive
 

When my husband went on our first date it was a sunny day in Center City Philadelphia. We were window shopping and ran into a parade just after having walked past the Liberty Bell when we saw the Budweiser Clydesdales coming towards on Chestnut street. They came to a stop just where we were standing…..it was a magical moment. We were allowed to speak with and touch the lead horse who was friendly and a gracious representative of our favorite beer which is also an American institution.

This is one of our favorite memories. We along with millions of others in this country take pride in the products and symbols of Budweiser, the fact that is is still family represented, the quality , the entertaining ads including appropriate and touching national event responses with ingenius use of their most gorgeous symbol those Clydesdales.

Please do not sell out. It is more important than profit. I am a minor stock holder and will continue to purchase only as long as it remains BUD. I will drink only Budweiser beer.

Posted by ANNYAH HASLER | Report as abusive
 

Down with Bud. If people weren’t so narrow minded and could actually think for themselves, they would discover that their are actually a lot of beers out there ten times better than Bud. Let the Belgians have it.

Posted by czechvar lover | Report as abusive
 

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