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Stanford whistleblowers tell of concerns, perks

February 20, 2009

For Mark Tidwell and Charles Rawl, former employees who filed a whistleblower lawsuit against Texas billionaire Allen Stanford’s financial empire, this week’s move by U.S. securities regulators to charge Stanford and two associates with “massive, ongoing fraud” brought a certain kind of redemption. But for the thousands of investors who now cannot tap into their accounwhistleblowersts until a court-appointed receiver sorts out claims, it could be a long wait.

Tidwell and Rawl both worked in Stanford’s posh Houston headquarters until December 2007, when they say they were forced to leave. In an interview with Reuters in Houston on Feb. 19. 2009, the two talked about their growing concerns while working at Stanford, as well as the silver-spooned culture that prevailed. Click here to hear audio

Mark Tidwell, 40, a former senior vice president at Stanford, recalls a plush dining room with a new menu every day, and perks aplenty for employees fortunate enough to make the “Top Producers Club.”

“You know it’s different when you pull in because there is a security guard that greets every car that pulls into the parking garage,” Tidwell said.

Photo credit: Reuters/Chris Baltimore (Tidwell, left, and Rawl, right, pictured at a Houston law office on Feb. 19, 2009)

Comments
2 comments so far | RSS Comments RSS

When will the stupidity stop? Isn’t obvious by now that the SEC should be under investigation and its duties suspended. The SEC hasn’t been minding the store or even worse, lining their pockets while guys like Madoff and Stanford continue to walk free. Wake up America!

Posted by Geoff | Report as abusive
 

good article

 

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