DealZone

No more rushing to the mailbox for those AmEx bills?

April 22, 2009

MASTERCARD/AMERICANEXPRESSRemember a couple of years ago, when it was discovered that an executive used his corporate American Express card to pay for $241,000 worth of “services” at a New York-based “gentleman’s club” then tried to stiff AmEx on paying the bill?

How might someone explain a $241,000 charge on his or her statement, to his or her boss (or his or her spouse, for that matter)when it gets sent to the home office — or worse, the home — at the end of the month?

“Wow, those steaks really WERE expensive.”

“We all had dessert.”

“There must be a missing decimal point somewhere. I hope.”

Well now, that problem might be a little easier to manage as American Express said on Tuesday it will no longer send paper copies of their bill to clients at large companies.

Now, some people like to get their AmEx bill in paper form and some people won’t mind that bill floating around the office … or the living room.

Anyway, what are your thoughts? Will you miss the paper statement or will the online version be just fine?  Should AmEx rethink this decision?

Comments
2 comments so far | RSS Comments RSS

Paperless is fine, but if it then means an online account, it means yet another username and password (preferably distinct from other account details, for added security). Managers in senior roles already have numerous log ins, and yet another one is probably not welcome.

An opt in/out policy would be better.

Posted by Helen S | Report as abusive
 

I don’t use AmEx, but I definately would NOT like it if my CC company quit sending a paper statement.

Posted by Drewbie | Report as abusive
 

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