DealZone

Saturday Night Live pokes Goldman on flu shots

November 10, 2009

Perhaps theGoldman Sachs CEO Lloyd Blankfein best barometer of public scorn is the Saturday Night Live indicator: if SNL derides you in a comedy sketch, chances are, lots of people dislike you.

Witness this skit from Saturday, where SNL lambasted Goldman Sachs for receiving H1N1 flu vaccines. Goldman’s official line is that the New York City health department gave it swine flu shots to distribute to employees that qualify for it, such as pregnant women.

But to SNL, this was a case of bankers jumping the line for a scarce vaccine.

“I understand you are an institution and like all institutions you need vaccines, but before schools and hospitals?,” said castmember Seth Meyers. “Do you not know that you currently have a serious PR problem?”

Goldman Sachs wasn’t the only bank to receive the vaccine. Morgan Stanley and Citigroup also received doses.

Morgan Stanley probably took the wisest route from a public relations standpoint — it donated its doses to local hospitals.

Photo courtesy of goldmansachs.com

Comments
One comment so far | RSS Comments RSS

But really, you know those Goldman Sachs people only wanted that swine flu so they could give it to charity, right? They just wanted to do their part, right? I mean, aren’t playing by the rules and Wall Street really synonymous? I mean, you know they’re telling the truth when they say that NOT ONE senior Goldman Sachs executive was vaccinated, except of course for the executives aged 6 months to 18 years, who are infant care-givers. I mean, can you imagine the impact on the nation if these incredibly bright, incredibly important men and women got the flu and – gasp — went home, leaving the levers of our economy untended? I say, give ‘em a double dose, and the little people be damned!

Posted by Mark Hugh Miller | Report as abusive
 

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