DealZone

Saab gasps and splutters

December 21, 2009

GM says is now evaluating not just a revised offer from Holland’s Spyker, but several new expressions of interest as well. It says that since Friday’s announcement that it would start the orderly wind-down of Saab, it has received inquiries from several parties. Perhaps GM calling it a day its Saab brand was a negotiating tactic meant to draw Spyker out on some of the finer points in their presumed-dead negotiations over salvaging the Swedish car maker.

Spyker said its renewed offer included an 11-point proposal addressing issues that arose during the due diligence process, one that eliminates the need for a European Investment Bank loan approval prior to the end of the year. That would allow it to beat GM’s deadline end-of-year deadline.

Ok. So we may have been premature in pronouncing Saab’s demise.  GM’s deadline – to keep this ghastly metaphor running – is more like a ventilator. Having already gone through its bankruptcy, GM executives may feel they have less reason to pull the plug than they did when they were themselves facing the end of the road. But is the prospect of a deal going to be enough to convince them to keep loss-making Saab alive for another month or more?

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Uppsala
According to the Swedish newspaper Svenska Dagbladet and it´s interview of Spyker´s Gen.Man. and owner Victor Muller,Skyper became interested in Saab after breakdown of the former bidder from Koenigsegg Group. That´s fine,the offer-and the latest renewed one to GM to buy Saab,sets even the press on the Swedish government to manage the possible downtown of Trollhättan,the city of Saab´s main building site.
There are many interesting perspectives on the wall here:
partly,how the modern autobuilding industry sees it´s both social and climate actorroles in the aftermath of financial crises and delayed climate renewing actions.
Are these industries proactive,working with innovative business plans,or only reactive with narrow financial and national interests in view?
Secondly,what´s the role of governments: are they only cleaning up after financial burdens of automakers,or do they have information from radically new kind of perspectives- directly or indirectly from media- which would give substance to another kind of investmentstrategies.
Lastly,is the GM itself a “dying dinosaur” in the world waiting for a new cultural developement stage,grounded for a new view of man and reality through a new paradigm of science fe.
The latest one is Vidorg´s rescue plan to Saab,and maybe even for GM (and indirectly to both USA and Swedish governments). Is the world waiting a Schumpeterian solution on this car-climate change issue- or a holistic,real change,where the Saab affair is only a piece of the puzzle or one line of developement frontiers?
Hopefully the governments info could be show more transparency here in these contacts and issues,than the warnings of the primeminister Frederik Reinfeldt in Sweden,of “not arrousing interests and hopes in the already suffering people- slain by the closed factories,
maintained through media.. (are these substancial evidence here?).
Whatabout opening the media or giving back the resources stolen from the innovative companies Reinfeldt or giving us the possibilities for a dialogue?

Lasse T. Laine,
Ceo,comp.owner Vidorg
Uppsala,Sweden

PS. Instead of Skyper´s dealing offer to buy Saab from GM,Vidor´s perspective is radically different one-opening both social and climate perspectives,and as one line of applications for the new paradigm work
(for another line,see fe. Vidorg´s proposal for reformation of the USA Health Care in a later developemental stage II,hopefully published by Reuter
yesterday ?)

Lasse T. Laine

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