DealZone

DealZone Daily

April 1, 2010

Thursday’s top stories:

* Dai-ichi Life Insurance (8750.T) jumps 14 percent in its market debut after Japan’s No. 2 life insurer priced its $11 billion initial public offering, the world’s biggest since 2008, at a discount to rival insurers.

* Struggling music major EMI has failed to clinch a licensing deal for its North American rights, sources said, making a covenant breach inevitable and pushing its owner Terra Firma back to investors for more cash.

* Australian gold miner Lihir Gold rejects a $8.45 billion takeover offer from rival Newcrest Mining , saying it failed to capture the growth potential in its biggest mine in Papua New Guinea and in West Africa.

* Scottish & Southern Energy (SSE.L) enters the upstream gas sector by agreeing to buy the North Sea natural gas and infrastructure assets of U.S. energy firm Hess Ltd (HES.N) for $423 million.

* General Growth Properties Inc of the United States filed an eagerly awaited plan to exit bankruptcy on its own and laid out bidding procedures, setting the stage for others like Simon Property Group Inc to jump in with rival offers.

* FSA watch: Seven people have been charged in a British insider trading case related to activities at the London printers for Swiss bank UBS AG (UBSN.VX)(UBS.N) and UK brokerage Cazenove (JPM.N).

* Peter Thal Larsen of Reuters Breakingviews examines a speech by the Bank of England’s executive director in charge of financial stability that “makes reference to the structure of al Qaeda, the limits of Facebook friendship, and the world domino-toppling record“. But, he says, the comments “contain a serious message: regulators are thinking increasingly radical thoughts about tackling big banks”.

For more on these and the rest of the latest deal-related news from Reuters, click here.

And elsewhere on the web (some external links may require subscriptions):

* U.S. hedge fund York Capital Management is in talks to sell a minority stake to the Swiss bank Credit Suisse, the Wall Street Journal says, citing people close to the matter.

Comments
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WE WANT TO INVEST IN YOUR PROJECT….

Funder/Investor will consider grouping projects into a Special Vehicle Fund to reach the $25.0 mill dollar minimum request…

Before terms and programs can be discussed about our funding source, all potential clients must possess the criteria mentioned in the announcement below:

a. You must have 10% POF liquid to contribute to the project.
b. Your funding request must be minimum $25.0 mil
c. You must have a business plan/exec summary.

Get Funded…..Minimum funding request is $25.0 mil

1. The client provides POF(liquid) 10% of the total funded amount. 2. The funder contributes 90% to the project as debt/equity or debt only. If equity position is taken (20% or 30%) then the loan does not have to be paid back. 3. If a client needs $100.0 mil funded, but they lack the 10%, then they can request a smaller amount based on the amount of POF liquid they do have, get the specified amount funded and turn around and fund the rest needed at a second stage. Understand, the 10% is rolled over into the total amount, and the funds are issued in draws – according to the need…

Lastly, if the project owner does not have a Business Plan or Exec. Summary, and the 10% POF, the funder does not want us to forward the deal…

If you meet these criteria, then you complete a business advisory agreement with us…MOVEAHEAD CONSULTING…and we put you in direct contact with the funder….NO UPFRONT FEES.

Thanks,

Lorraine McNair
Business Advisor
Acquisition Contractor
moveahead162@yahoo.com
765-506-8048

Posted by moveahead | Report as abusive
 

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