DealZone

Deals wrap: Consolidation wave to grow for exchanges

Professional surfer Kelly Slater (L) catches a 40 foot wave beside Grant Baker during the Eddie Aikau Big Wave Invitational surf contest at Waimea Bay on the North Shore of Oahu in Haleiwa, Hawaii December 8, 2009. REUTERS/Hugh Gentry “The mergers of exchanges have only just begun as growing competition and even new regulation drive them closer together, irrespective of national borders,” write correspondents Luke Jeffs and Rachelle Younglai from the Reuters Future Face of Finance Summit.

As talk of future exchange deals swells, the CEO of the Singapore Exchange said he’s not planning any more concessions to Australian officials to win approval for his exchange’s $7.7 billion bid late last year for that country’s bourse operator ASX.

J. Crew will once again be a private company after shareholders approved a $2.86 billion deal for the retailer to be acquired by TPG Capital and Leonard Green & Partners.

Chrysler has taken the first step to re-enter the U.S. capital markets through filings with the Securities and Exchange Commission, the automaker’s boss, Sergio Marchionne, told Reuters Insider TV on the sidelines of the Geneva Motor Show on Tuesday.

Who will succeed Warren Buffett at the helm of Berkshire Hathaway? That’s still anybody’s guess, but according to Dealbook the company’s board has identified four managers it says could fill his shoes as CEO when the investment titan, now 80, retires.

Deals du Jour

Abu Dhabi sells 3.5 billion pounds of shares in Barclays, making a handy profit, and sending the stock down well over 10 percent. In another share sale, wind turbine maker Gamesa is suspended after Iberdrola offloads 10 percent of the company in the market. Otherwise, cars still dominate: GM has filed for bankruptcy, Germany is to pay bridge financing to Opel today and a U.S. judge said overnight the sale of Chrysler will be effective on Friday. Here are today’s top deals headlines.

And in the newspapers:

British publishing group Pearson is in talks with Prisa over the possibility of buying a stake in Santillana, the Spanish media firm’s publishing house and market leader in school textbooks in Latin America, the Financial Times reported.
Prisa could be looking to sell up to 30 percent of the unit in a 315 million pound deal. Other bidders include Cengage Learning, Oxford University Press and Infinitas Learning, the paper says.

Citigroup Inc told about five former top executives they will not be paid tens of millions of dollars in promised severance payouts, the Wall Street Journal cited people familiar with the matter as saying.