DealZone

from Funds Hub:

Watch Pi Capital CEO David Giampaolo give his investment outlook

Giampaolo was speaking today at the London leg of the Reuters Hedge Fund and Private Equity Summit.

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from Funds Hub:

Watch hedge fund manager Colin McLean give his market outlook

McLean was speaking today at London leg of the Reuters Hedge Fund and Private Equity Summit.

from Funds Hub:

$3 trillion of hedge fund talent? “Absolute nonsense!”

The once-booming hedge fund industry has shrunk rapidly over the past 9 months to roughly $1-$1.4 trillion, as investors have pulled out their cash following some pretty lacklustre returns.

kfd05However, according to Mark Kary, chief executive of Polar Capital, the industry never really deserved to have grown to the best part of $3 trillion in the first place.

He told today's Reuters Hedge Fund and Private Equity Summit in London that while hedge funds had become a "fashion item" in the good times, when it comes down to it there simply isn't enough talent to support an industry of $3 trillion.

from Funds Hub:

Odey spies ‘the death of safety’

By Simon Falush

 

So you thought safe-haven pharmaceuticals and food producers were a safe place to shelter your assets?

 

rtx923rThink again, says Crispin Odey, the well-known hedge fund manager who thrives on a contrarian approach to equity investing. He tells Reuters that defensives could be the next target for short sellers.

 

"I certainly wouldn't own them and they look like they're becoming interesting shorts. It's an interesting bit of the market that people aren't looking at."

from Funds Hub:

Blowin’ in the wind

rtr22twuThe timing of the Alternative Investment Management Association's hedge fund disclosure initiative indicates just how strong the winds of change are blowing in hedge fund land.

Coming just a day after ECB President Jean-Claude Trichet called the credit crisis "a loud and clear call" for extending hedge fund regulation, the move shows the hedge fund industry feels it must be more active in deciding the future shape of regulation.

The move, which will include regular -- probably quarterly -- disclosure of systemically significant holdings and risk exposure to national regulators, goes further than that suggested at last month's Treasury Select Committee by Marshall Wace chairman and Hedge Fund Standards Board trustee Paul Marshall, who had proposed aggregating data through prime brokers.

from Funds Hub:

A loud and clear call

rtr1y8m4It may not have been a massive surprise, but ECB President Jean-Claude Trichet had an unwelcome message for hedge fund managers today.

The current crisis is, apparently, "a loud and clear call" to roll out regulation to all important market players, "notably hedge funds and credit rating agencies".

For those hedge fund managers who felt, perhaps with a degree of justification, that their industry had been relatively blameless in precipitating the current crisis, that call may have been somewhat quieter and more muffled.

from Funds Hub:

Saving Hendry? Thanks but no thanks, says Hugh

rtr1z9ud1It was always unlikely that a letter of advice was going to change the mind of maverick hedge fund manager Hugh Hendry.

 

And in his latest letter to investors, Hendry has smartly rebuffed any attempt to 'save' him from his bond investments.

 

The letter in question -- Gregor.us's monthly note, entitled "Saving Hugh Hendry" -- praises the Eclectica co-founder and CIO as a "brilliant and colourful" hedge fund manager who saw the coming storm and took cover well in advance.

from Funds Hub:

Staying positive

rtr23yfeThere seems to be an endless wave of bad news hitting the hedge fund industry at the moment -- gates and suspensions, record poor performance, the Bernard Madoff scandal and so forth -- but there are still one or two reasons to be positive.

According to a survey of institutional investors by alternative assets data group Preqin, conducted in January (and therefore after the alleged Madoff fraud came to light), only 8 percent said they were no longer confident about hedge funds and would reduce investments.

By contrast, 26 percent said they would be increasing their allocations this year.

from Funds Hub:

After the storm

stormThe latest update on funds of hedge funds (FoHFs) performance arrives from Fitch Ratings -- and it makes for an unsurprisingly sober read.

We perhaps know already that 2008 was the worst year ever for FoHFs, and that cumulative losses reached an all-time high as the year ended with a Madoff-shaped bang. Fitch also raises a fear that managers have shared after imposing redemption restrictions on clients wanting to stash their cash under the proverbial mattress:

The year has witnessed a wave of managers implementing restraints on clients’ access to their assets, thus putting again into question the business and sales model of the industry

from Funds Hub:

Has the moment for greater UK hedge fund regulation passed?

Tuesday's grilling of UK hedge fund executives is likely to create plenty of noise but produce little in the way of new rules.

While media-shy TCI founder Chris Hohn and others will face tough questions from the Treasury Select Committee on financial stability, short-selling and other issues, it nevertheless seems that the pro-legislation lobby's position may be weaker than it has been in recent years.

For one thing, many hedge funds simply do not have the financial clout -- and therefore carry the associated risks seen by some politicians -- that they once did.