DealZone

Deals wrap: MGM China IPO may be a gamble for investors

Macau casino operator MGM China, co-owned in part by casino mogul Stanley Ho’s daughter Pansy Ho, raised $1.5 billion from its Hong Kong initial public offering after pricing it at the top of its indicative range, triggering some concerns about lofty valuations.

Gambling revenues in the world’s largest gaming market are at record highs, dwarfing those of Las Vegas and fueling a surge in share prices of local casino operators that boosted demand for MGM China’s IPO.

But the rally may have pushed stock prices in the sector too far, reducing their appeal to some investors according to some analysts.

However, shares of Macau’s biggest casino operator SJM Holdings, which has nearly three times the revenue of MGM China, have surged nearly 52 percent so far this year. If MGM China can duplicate the success of SJM, the fears about high valuations should subside.

With the deal Pansy Ho is now worth nearly $2 billion more than her legendary casino father “king” Stanley.

Deals wrap: Treasury sells stake of AIG

The Treasury made a small profit when it sold a portion of its shares in AIG, but it was unclear how its investment in the beleaguered insurer will ultimately fare.

Tuesday’s $8.7 billion stock offering, (being dubbed by some as AIG’s re-IPO) which included 200 million shares sold by the Treasury and 100 million sold by AIG itself, is far smaller than the $10 billion to $20 billion deal some banking sources had suggested earlier this year, hinting at a potential lack of investor interest.

With the sale, the Treasury has raised $5.8 billion of the $47.5 billion it needs to break even and now has another 1.5 billion shares to sell.

Deals wrap: Jimmy Choo sold to Labelux

Upscale British shoemaker and retailer Jimmy Choo was bought by luxury goods group Labelux from TowerBrook Capital Partners, the companies said.

The companies did not disclose terms of the deal, but two sources familiar with the deal said it was worth about $812 million.

The deal, according to Footwear News, will help Jimmy Choo makes inroads into the Asian market thanks in part to Bally’s strong presence in the area. Labelux purchased Bally’s in 2008 but added that the two brands will operate independently.

Deals wrap: Copycats sure to follow LinkedIn

A day after LinkedIn’s shares more than doubled in their public trading debut, analysts are scrambling to explain why the stock exploded and figure out what happens next.

The professional networking site’s IPO was being closely watched by Facebook, Groupon, Twitter and Zynga to gauge investors’ appetite for Internet companies.

Facebook COO Sheryl Sandberg described a public offering of Facebook shares as “inevitable,” while Evelyn M. Rusli over on DealBook predicts a surge in Internet IPO’s but doesn’t think the market is setting itself up for another tech bubble burst.

Deals wrap: Glencore debuts while markets await LinkedIn

Commodities trader Glencore made a steady market debut with shares trading just above the widely expected launch price of 530 pence, giving it solid currency for potential acquisitions.

There was heavy interest in the stock on both the London and Hong Kong exchanges, due in part to the relatively small amount of shares being sold. Glencore’s Chief Executive and largest shareholder Ivan Glasenberg said demand for the shares “significantly” exceeded the amount available.

Analysts on Thursday said the 530 pence per share level was realistic and should mean strong aftermarket support. “Obviously everything is priced to do well. I don’t know whether five to ten percent upside is in the bag or not, but certainly they are trying to please investors with the price,” analyst Tim Dudley at Collins Stewart said.

Deals wrap: Investors willing to overlook LinkedIn’s risks

LinkedIn’s IPO, which is expected to price after the close of U.S. markets on Wednesday and start trading on Thursday, appears set to be a stunning success, but it carries a number of risks that may shake up investors in the future.

Potential risks include LinkedIn’s gutsy bet on future growth, an admission that it does not expect to be profitable in 2011 and the prospect of having its site blocked, which would limit its user base and could curtail some of the potential growth so attractive to investors.

After two years of losses, LinkedIn finally made money for its common stockholders in 2010 — but then it was back to only breaking even in the first quarter of 2011. A profitable company flatlining or swinging to a loss in its first year as a publicly traded stock could prove an unwelcome surprise for investors betting on the booming growth of social media companies.

Deals wrap: LinkedIn boosts IPO, pushes more air into bubble

LinkedIn, the social networking site for professionals, boosted the pricing of its initial public offering by 30 percent valuing the 9-year old company at a little over $4 billion, or about 17 times their 2010 revenue.

LinkedIn’s IPO, which is scheduled for Thursday, comes on the heels of what appears to be an unsuccessful offering Renren.

Earlier this month Renren, one of the biggest social networking sites in China, stock surged 29 percent in their debut but it has since dropped to below its IPO price.

Deals wrap: AIG’s $9 billion stock offer less than half of what was expected

American International Group and the Treasury will sell nearly $9 billion in stock as the bailed-out insurer begins its return to public control. This offering is less than half of what had been expected when Wall Street banks offered their services to manage the stock sale in January. The company was rescued in September 2008, receiving $182 billion in bailouts and managed to restructure while preserving two core businesses. At the time, few expected AIG would even exist today.

Professional networking service website LinkedIn is looking to go public, a move that could value the company at more than $3 billion. In this article, NYT’s Steven M. Davidoff explains why certain plans LinkedIn has for its IPO would “not only disenfranchise its future shareholders, but contains elements that have been heavily criticized by corporate governance advocates.”

The impact of AT&T’s proposed acquisition of T-Mobile on competition, pricing and consumer choice will be examined at a congressional hearing, where top executives are scheduled to appear to defend the deal. A successful merger would concentrate 80 percent of U.S. wireless contract customers in just two companies — AT&T/T-Mobile and Verizon Wireless.

Deals wrap: M&A is back

A sign is pictured on Wall St. near the New York Stock Exchange in New York November 25, 2008. REUTERS/Lucas Jackson Dealmaking is back on the agenda as CEOs step up the hunt for ways to put a multitrillion-dollar cash pile to work, triggering the busiest January for M&A in 11 years.

If ProLogis and AMB Property’s recently announced talks on a “merger of equals” pan out, AMB Property is likely to be the real buyer and ProLogis the target, investors and Wall Street analysts said.

Sara Lee plans to split into two separate public companies focusing on North American meats and international coffee after takeover bids it received were not enough to entice it to sell the company.

Deals wrap: LinkedIn’s IPO plans

The Wall Street sign is seen outside the New York Stock Exchange, March 26, 2009.   REUTERS/Chip EastLinkedIn plans to go public in 2011 and has selected its financial underwriters, three sources familiar with the process told Reuters.

Interest in Facebook shares is so strong that Goldman Sachs plans to stop soliciting interest from potential investors on Thursday, the Wall Street Journal reported, citing people familiar with the situation.

Felix Salmon lists reasons why Facebook won’t go public.

TechCrunch rebuts some recent themes surrounding Facebook in the blogosphere.