Not by the hair on their chinny chin chin

November 5, 2015
Tommaso Gaggi holds a dead wild boar during an hunt in Castell'Azzara, Tuscany, central Italy, November 1, 2015. REUTERS/Max Rossi

Tommaso Gaggi holds a dead wild boar during an hunt in Castell’Azzara, Tuscany, Italy, November 1, 2015. REUTERS/Max Rossi

And this little piggy wreaked havoc on an entire country.

Italy is facing a massive wild boar problem. Rampaging boar are destroying crops, causing road accidents and, yes, even attacking people, Italian authorities say. The problem has emboldened hunting parties to try to control the invasive animal’s soaring population, though this practice has done little to slow the boars’ rise.

Let’s hope the Italians can bring home the bacon. Read on for more news you might have missed:

 

Putting the ‘reform’ in Reform Judaism

The U.S. conference of Reform Jews makes sweeping changes to embrace transgender people.

 

Panera embraces the cage-free life

Panera Bread announces that it will only use cage-free eggs by 2020, joining a growing trend among U.S. restaurant and fast-food chains.

 

Turkey trot becomes a stampede

An estimated 25.3 million people are expected to fly on U.S. airlines this Thanksgiving, up 3 percent from the previous year. Better start heading to the airport now.

 

Okay, well now they definitely have bad blood

Katy Perry beat out Taylor Swift — by a lot — to become the highest-grossing female music performer this year, earning $135 million to Swift’s $80 million. Guess Taylor will just have to shake it off.

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