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Spoiling the party

October 27, 2010

Last month The New York Times had a story about Arizona Republicans putting up homeless people as candidates for the Green Party in elections there. Now Murray Waas, our Barlett & Steele award winner, has a special report about Democratic Party shenanigans. 

USA-ELECTIONS/TRICKSWaas went to Pennsylvania’s 7th district to show how Democrats helped get Tea Party activist Jim Schneller (left) on the ballot, hoping to siphon off votes from the Republican candidate.

This is what one Democrat involved in the scheme had to say:

Abu Rahman, the president of the Delaware County Asian American Democratic Association and a Lentz supporter, who admits he gathered signatures for Schneller, said in an interview that he had some mixed feelings about what he was doing. “I remember thinking to myself that this is not clean,” Rahman said, “But it is not illegal.”   

 He acknowledged in an interview that by helping Schneller get on the ballot, he clearly understood that he was going to “dry up Republican votes.”  

 Rahman explained why he moved forward despite his reservations: “We really had to consider what was at stake. This is a really crucial election. We don’t want to hand it to the Republicans. It’s just too, too important for our country.”

Politico has a story on this subject today as well.

Tell us what you think — is this just business as usual, or should something be done to stop it?

 

 

 

 

Comments

No question it should be stopped. Fraud is not too strong a word to describe it; fraud and misrepresentation. Both sides ought to be ashamed of themselves.

Posted by Gotthardbahn | Report as abusive
 

It is a 2 party system that has worked hard in the past to keep it that way. This is why you’ll see relatively many independent candidates as compared to an actual tea-party party on the ballot.
It is good that it is easy for independent candidates to be registered, and it would be a shame if this practice will result in the creation of barriers for independent candidates of the same level that keep other parties from getting on the ballots (and get federal funding).
This is an artifact of the system, if you want to stop the practice go to a system where seats are awarded based on total votes in a state/nation rather than per district. But creating more barriers will just reinforce the two party system.

Posted by BasHamer | Report as abusive
 

“This is a really crucial election.” As if they all aren’t crucial.

“It’s just too, too important for our country [to prevent the Republican from winning].” When I read this I practically got sick to my stomach. The level of arrogance displayed is just…stunning.

Posted by Randy549 | Report as abusive
 

It is no where near as underhanded, outright hypocritical, underhanded and just plain wrong in substance as are the Republican tactics that I see being used in my state at this moment.

Posted by ayesee | Report as abusive
 

This is a splitting the vote tactic, but it is using a sincere candidate as the wedge. Republicans running homeless candidates as Greens is unethical on steroids.
We know that neither straw man candidate will win, yet the Green Party has a man who is willing to run and serve. If Dems fight arson with clean water, it is a fair strategy to help the Green man who honestly wants to serve.
What would Republicans do if the Homer Homeless won?
Demand a recount, is my guess.
bobby99

Posted by BOBBY99 | Report as abusive
 

…and voters are to be ashamed for not realizing the qualified choices.
I only vote third party if I know for certain that the Republican will win by a wide margin, or that My Guy is a shoo-in.
bobby99

Posted by BOBBY99 | Report as abusive
 

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