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ElBaradei: From nuclear diplomat to Cairo politics

February 16, 2011

EGYPT/ELBARADEI-SQUAREWho is Mohamed ElBaradei, the professional Egyptian opposition figure who joined the ranks of disaffected Eypgtians to topple President Hosni Mubarak after thirty years in power?  Does the 68-year-old diplomat and lawyer have what it takes to become Egypt’s next president if it holds free and fair elections? 

Louis Charbonneau’s special report takes a close look at ElBaradei’s performance while at the helm of the U.N. International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), where he stood toe-to-toe with the Bush administration over Iraq and Iran. It tells how he survived a plot by hawkish U.S. politician John Bolton to oust him and went on to win the Nobel Peace Prize in 2005 jointly with the IAEA, the U.N. nuclear watchdog.  It looks into his questionable record as a manager while showing that he may have what it takes to lead Egypt — if he wants the job. 

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Comments

Yes, he may be the man for heading the Transitional / National Govt. during the interim period.

His skills coupled with no political ambition / experience may be the right mix that is needed to develop the New Constitution as well as the pillars, institutions reqd. by Democratic Egypt.

Posted by Eagleeye47 | Report as abusive
 

He is tenacious and above corruption. But is he a leader?

http://defend-free-speech.blogspot.com/2 011/02/stories-of-revolution-scientist-w ho.html

Posted by faubluewave | Report as abusive
 

It is not what the US wants. It is what the people of Egypt want. The question is not relevant.

Posted by d_evil | Report as abusive
 

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