Reuters Investigates

Insight and investigations from our expert reporters

More bloodshed in Monterrey

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After the latest news from Mexico where armed men torched a casino in Monterrey, killing at least 52 people, it’s a good time to re-read Robin Emmott’s special report “If Monterrey falls, Mexico falls.”

As the story says:

In just four years, Monterrey, a manufacturing city of 4 million people 140 miles from the Texan border, has gone from being a model for developing economies to a symbol of Mexico’s drug war chaos, sucked down into a dark spiral of gangland killings, violent crime and growing lawlessness.

Since President Felipe Calderon launched an army-led war on the cartels in late 2006, grenade attacks, beheadings, firefights and drive-by killings have surged.

That has shattered this city’s international image as a boomtown where captains of industry built steel, cement and beer giants in the desert in less than a century — Mexico’s version of Dallas or Houston.

Surviving the patent cliff

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Ransdell Pierson examines the outlook for drugmaker Eli Lilly today in a special report “Lilly’s survival plan is far from generic.”

The 134-year-old company faces a sharp fall in profits as patents expire in the coming years for some of its key drugs. It’s a common problem in the industry, as this graphic shows.

Covering the story of Mexico’s narco orphans

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MEXICO/Our latest special report is not a feel-good story. Catherine Bremer visited an orphanage in Ciudad Juarez, the epicenter of Mexico’s drug war, to tell the largely overlooked story of the tens of thousands of children whose lives are blighted by drug violence.

Northern Mexico is a tough place to work. This is what our Monterrey correspondent Robin Emmott has to say about covering the drug war: