Reynolds's Feed
May 4, 2015
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Mylan may have found cure for the common conflict

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The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own.

Mylan may have found a cure for the common conflict of interest. The drugmaker is suing its former lawyers at Kirkland & Ellis for advising Teva Pharmaceutical on its $40 billion hostile bid to buy the company. The attorneys say Mylan consented, but a court may finally rule such waivers unethical. An even better outcome would be if the case emboldens clients to stop signing them.

Apr 2, 2015
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NY judge gives 1970s sitcom a Silicon Valley spin

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The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own.

New York’s federal court has given a 1970s sitcom some Silicon Valley spin. A judge concluded that a “Three’s Company” parody didn’t violate rights to the television hit, despite similarities. The verdict reflects Big Apple legal thinking that ideas are for sharing.

Apr 2, 2015
via Breakingviews

NY judge gives 1970s sitcom a Silicon Valley spin

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The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own.

New York’s federal court has given a 1970s sitcom some Silicon Valley spin. A judge concluded that a “Three’s Company” parody didn’t violate rights to the television hit, despite similarities. The verdict reflects Big Apple legal thinking that ideas are for sharing.

Mar 31, 2015
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Silicon Valley’s noble goals hit home in Indiana

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The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own.

Silicon Valley’s noble goals are hitting home in Indiana. Apple, Google and other technology companies often fall short of promises to make the world a better place. Opposing discriminatory laws in the Hoosier State and elsewhere could help make up for lost ground.

Mar 30, 2015

Breakingviews-Silicon Valley’s noble goals hit home in Indiana

By Reynolds Holding

NEW YORK (Reuters Breakingviews) – Silicon Valley’s noble
goals are hitting home in Indiana. Apple, Google
and other technology companies often fall short of
promises to make the world a better place. Opposing
discriminatory laws in the Hoosier State and elsewhere could
help make up for lost ground.

The Religious Freedom Restoration Act, signed into law last
week, would prohibit Indiana from substantially encroaching on
anyone’s religious beliefs. Critics say it’s a veiled way to
allow restaurants or other businesses to turn away gay
customers. Some 30 states and the federal government enacted
similar protections, but Indiana’s fills the legal loopholes
that exposed a statute in New Mexico, for example, to a court
challenge. It also explicitly grants businesses religious
rights.

Mar 29, 2015
via Breakingviews

Silicon Valley trials start as sexism lawsuit ends

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The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own.

A sexism case that riveted the technology and investment communities has come to an end, but Silicon Valley’s trial is only beginning. Venture capital firm Kleiner Perkins Caufield & Byers on Friday was exonerated of discrimination allegations brought by former employee Ellen Pao. Many similar lawsuits await, however, and the court of public opinion has yet to deliver its verdict.

Mar 23, 2015
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Elliott emits ray of pragmatism in Argentina feud

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The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own.

Elliott Management has emitted the merest glimmer of pragmatism in its feud with Argentina. The hedge fund, with a U.S. judge’s approval, will allow Citigroup to process two of the country’s bond payments, despite an earlier court-ordered block. It’s a concession to cover the bank’s back, not a broader shift in the intractable spat between holdout creditors and Argentina. But it may qualify as progress.

Mar 23, 2015
via Breakingviews

Elliott emits ray of pragmatism in Argentina feud

Photo

The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own.

Elliott Management has emitted the merest glimmer of pragmatism in its feud with Argentina. The hedge fund, with a U.S. judge’s approval, will allow Citigroup to process two of the country’s bond payments, despite an earlier court-ordered block. It’s a concession to cover the bank’s back, not a broader shift in the intractable spat between holdout creditors and Argentina. But it may qualify as progress.

Mar 11, 2015
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Silicon Valley sexism case tests new M&M color

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By Reynolds Holding

The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own.

Silicon Valley’s latest sexism trial is testing a new flavor of M&M’s. Venture capitalists at Kleiner Perkins Caufield & Byers didn’t slip the button-sized chocolates down a woman’s blouse, behavior that prompted a $3.5 million judgment against a law firm’s Palo Alto office two decades ago. But they’re charged with unfairly blocking a female’s rise to the top. It’s a subtler, more toxic type of discrimination that suggests little has changed in the technology world’s ecosystem.

Mar 4, 2015

Breakingviews: Now (finally) playing: royalties for online music

By Reynolds Holding

NEW YORK (Reuters Breakingviews) – Online music is starting
to sing licensing agencies’ tune. The American Society of
Composers, Authors and Publishers says it collected over $1
billion in royalties for the first time last year and
distributed a record $883 million, much of it for songs streamed
over the internet. Even so, a system that often pays artists
less than a penny per play needs a rewrite.

A century ago, ASCAP helped its members earn money from
their work by selling blanket performance licenses and passing
along the proceeds. In 1941, trustbusters clipped its power to
set rates. But the system worked well enough for ASCAP and rival
BMI until internet streaming came along, changing how people
listen to music and prompting the two to demand higher fees.

    • About Reynolds

      "Reynolds Holding is a Breakingviews columnist who writes from New York about the law in conjunction with Reuters Legal. Before joining Breakingviews, he was a national editorial producer for the Law & Justice Unit at ABC News, a senior writer for Time magazine and the executive editor of Legal Affairs, the first general interest magazine about the law. He spent more than a decade as an investigative reporter and columnist for The San Francisco Chronicle, where he was named a Pulitzer Prize finalist for explanatory writing. Before becoming a journalist, he practiced corporate law at the New York firm of ..."
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