Reynolds's Feed
Nov 4, 2015
via Breakingviews

Trader’s conviction vindicates juror cyber smarts

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The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own.

The conviction of a U.S. commodities trader vindicates juries’ cyber smarts. Prosecutors won their first trial over what is known as spoofing: the practice of manipulating prices by placing and quickly cancelling orders. Algorithms performed the actual transactions, making criminal intent tough to prove. Yet a lightning-fast verdict shows jurors are up to the task of nailing high-speed market cheats.

Nov 4, 2015
via Breakingviews

Trader’s conviction vindicates juror cyber smarts

Photo

The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own.

The conviction of a U.S. commodities trader vindicates juries’ cyber smarts. Prosecutors won their first trial over what is known as spoofing: the practice of manipulating prices by placing and quickly cancelling orders. Algorithms performed the actual transactions, making criminal intent tough to prove. Yet a lightning-fast verdict shows jurors are up to the task of nailing high-speed market cheats.

Nov 3, 2015
via Breakingviews

Investors top courts as judges of banker conflicts

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The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own. 

Shareholders may beat courts as judges of banker conflicts. A Delaware jurist reversed his own ruling and tossed claims that Bank of America Merrill Lynch played both sides of Signet Jewelers’ $1.4 billion purchase of rival Zale. His decision came after a higher court said shareholder approval of a deal can override such charges. A crackdown on advisers’ skewed loyalties is overdue, but owners deserve a say on when it goes too far.

Nov 3, 2015
via Breakingviews

Investors top courts as judges of banker conflicts

Photo

The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own. 

Shareholders may beat courts as judges of banker conflicts. A Delaware jurist reversed his own ruling and tossed claims that Bank of America Merrill Lynch played both sides of Signet Jewelers’ $1.4 billion purchase of rival Zale. His decision came after a higher court said shareholder approval of a deal can override such charges. A crackdown on advisers’ skewed loyalties is overdue, but owners deserve a say on when it goes too far.

Nov 3, 2015
via Breakingviews

UK flunks Uncle Sam’s class-action lawsuit lessons

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The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own.

Britain may be creating its own problematic class-action culture. Suing en masse is now allowed in the UK so long as losers pay winners’ legal fees. That and other rules might limit the perceived excesses of U.S.-style group suits but could also make worthy cases too costly to file. If outsiders bankroll them, that risks conflicts and other dangers.

Nov 3, 2015
via Breakingviews

UK flunks Uncle Sam’s class-action lawsuit lessons

Photo

The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own.

Britain may be creating its own problematic class-action culture. Suing en masse is now allowed in the UK so long as losers pay winners’ legal fees. That and other rules might limit the perceived excesses of U.S.-style group suits but could also make worthy cases too costly to file. If outsiders bankroll them, that risks conflicts and other dangers.

Oct 28, 2015
via Breakingviews

Goldman thwacking marks revolving-door reckoning

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The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own.

The latest thwack to Goldman Sachs marks a revolving-door reckoning of sorts. The bank led by Lloyd Blankfein will pay $50 million for not monitoring an employee’s too-cozy relationship with the Federal Reserve Bank of New York, where he used to work. It’s chump change as far as fines go, but Goldman admitted fault – and it drives home the message that Washington-to-Wall Street transfers bear closer scrutiny.

Oct 28, 2015
via Breakingviews

Goldman thwacking marks revolving-door reckoning

Photo

The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own.

The latest thwack to Goldman Sachs marks a revolving-door reckoning of sorts. The bank led by Lloyd Blankfein will pay $50 million for not monitoring an employee’s too-cozy relationship with the Federal Reserve Bank of New York, where he used to work. It’s chump change as far as fines go, but Goldman admitted fault – and it drives home the message that Washington-to-Wall Street transfers bear closer scrutiny.

Oct 22, 2015
via Breakingviews

Mets and America pull off a slick double play

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The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are their own. 

The New York Mets and the U.S. economy have pulled off a slick double play. As America staggered under the weight of dodgy mortgages, the baseball team was snookered by Ponzi schemer Bernard Madoff. Massive infusions of money helped right Uncle Sam, but the Amazins took a far more frugal path to revival – and a possible World Series title.

Oct 22, 2015
via Breakingviews

Mets and America pull off a slick double play

Photo

The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are their own. 

The New York Mets and the U.S. economy have pulled off a slick double play. As America staggered under the weight of dodgy mortgages, the baseball team was snookered by Ponzi schemer Bernard Madoff. Massive infusions of money helped right Uncle Sam, but the Amazins took a far more frugal path to revival – and a possible World Series title.

    • About Reynolds

      "Reynolds Holding is a Breakingviews columnist who writes from New York about the law in conjunction with Reuters Legal. Before joining Breakingviews, he was a national editorial producer for the Law & Justice Unit at ABC News, a senior writer for Time magazine and the executive editor of Legal Affairs, the first general interest magazine about the law. He spent more than a decade as an investigative reporter and columnist for The San Francisco Chronicle, where he was named a Pulitzer Prize finalist for explanatory writing. Before becoming a journalist, he practiced corporate law at the New York firm of ..."
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