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Nov 14, 2011
via Breakingviews

Insider trading another reason to Occupy Congress

By Richard Beales and Reynolds Holding
The authors are Reuters Breakingviews columnists. The opinions expressed are their own.

Occupy Congress has garnered far less attention than the global protest movement that started as Occupy Wall Street in lower Manhattan. But politicians helped create the financial crisis. Fresh news of U.S. lawmakers trading on inside information is further reason for mistrust.

Oct 6, 2011

Jobs, no ordinary CEO, leaves no ordinary company

(The authors are Reuters Breakingviews columnists. The opinions
expressed are their own.)

By Robert Cyran and Richard Beales

NEW YORK, Oct 5 (Reuters Breakingviews) – Steve Jobs has
died at 56. He was no ordinary chief executive, and he leaves
no ordinary company. The force behind the iPod, iPhone and iPad
not only co-founded and then rescued Apple (AAPL.O: Quote, Profile, Research, Stock Buzz), building
it into the most valuable tech company on the planet, worth
some $350 billion. He also changed the way people live. It’s a
rare entrepreneur who leaves that legacy — and a company that
can thrive without him.

Oct 6, 2011

Breakingviews-Jobs, no ordinary CEO, leaves no ordinary company

(The authors are Reuters Breakingviews columnists. The opinions
expressed are their own.)

By Robert Cyran and Richard Beales

NEW YORK, Oct 5 (Reuters Breakingviews) – Steve Jobs has
died at 56. He was no ordinary chief executive, and he leaves
no ordinary company. The force behind the iPod, iPhone and iPad
not only co-founded and then rescued Apple (AAPL.O: Quote, Profile, Research), building
it into the most valuable tech company on the planet, worth
some $350 billion. He also changed the way people live. It’s a
rare entrepreneur who leaves that legacy — and a company that
can thrive without him.

Oct 5, 2011
via Breakingviews

A manifesto for Occupy Wall Street

By Richard Beales and Edward Hadas
The authors are Reuters Breakingviews columnists. The opinions expressed are their own.

For public relations professionals, the wannabe protesters in Zuccotti Park in Lower Manhattan must inspire mixed feelings. The location works and the crowd makes for good TV, but crunchy soundbites are hard to find. The movement’s anti-corporate rant lumps together complaints ranging from mortgage foreclosure wrongs to torture. And the idea of “a feeling of mass injustice” is much less compelling than the Tea Party’s clear “taxed enough already.” Breakingviews offers a four-point program — a practical and sharper, if partial, manifesto for Occupy Wall Street.

Aug 30, 2011
via Breakingviews

Spin-off trend isn’t just for investment bankers

By Richard Beales
The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own.

Conglomerates, even relatively focused ones, are out of favor. Hence companies from Hewlett-Packard to Kraft Foods to ConocoPhillips have in recent weeks decided to split into pieces. It’s tempting to think only Wall Street’s bankers, who helped stitch these hulking groups together in the first place, benefit most from this trend. But a couple of big examples — Marathon Oil and Motorola — suggest investors do well too.

Aug 29, 2011
via Breakingviews

Bernanke’s inaction, even if temporary, is welcome

By Richard Beales
The opinions expressed are his own.

Stock investors may have been briefly underwhelmed, but Ben Bernanke was right not to promise new easing in his speech in Jackson Hole on Friday. Aside from its likely ineffectiveness at juicing the U.S. economy and its stubbornly weak job creation, the Federal Reserve chairman faces dissent at the Federal Open Market Committee. That’ll make the now extended September meeting a new focus for markets.

Markets had rallied a bit on hopes that Bernanke would announce more Fed bond-buying, as he did at the same event last year. But most analysts felt, rightly as it turned out, that his options are more limited now. The last round of quantitative easing, known as QE2, was marginal even in the minds of some of its supporters at the Fed, and inconclusive at best in its impact. And the FOMC’s Aug. 9 promise — that it would keep interest rates ultra-low well into 2013, with only the mildest of caveats — already attracted dissent from three of the 10 committee members who voted.

Aug 7, 2011

Credit ratings love-hate has simple answer

By Richard Beales

NEW YORK (Reuters Breakingviews) – It’s a love-hate relationship. The White House doesn’t like the fact that Standard & Poor’s downgraded America’s debt on Friday — it even picked holes in the firm’s numbers. European officials don’t welcome critiques of sovereign credit, either. Yet governments seem broadly inclined to regulate rating firms tightly. The better answer is to cut them loose.

Without official recognition, the powerful big three raters — S&P, Moody’s Investors Service and Fitch Ratings — would eventually become just competitors with other credit researchers. Investors would have to decide whose analysis was most credible. They could ignore S&P if they chose, or discount all three firms’ views because of their many failures to spot early warning signs ahead of the 2008 crisis and look elsewhere for insight.

Aug 5, 2011
via Breakingviews

Latest rout a reminder recovery will be a slog

By Richard Beales
The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own.

Contrary to the chatter, slumping financial markets aren’t a repeat of 2008. The action, though alarming, is more like a belated recognition that unwinding the rest of the pre-crisis excesses will take years. Politicians may have made the aftermath of the crunch less bad. Now they need to avoid action that makes things worse.

Jul 20, 2011
via Breakingviews

Year-old Dodd-Frank punches, if below its weight

By Richard Beales
The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own.

NEW YORK –  Happy Birthday, Dodd-Frank. With a final 848 closely-printed pages of law and over 3,300 pages of rules (and counting, thanks to bank lobbyists), the U.S. financial reforms passed a year ago are cumbersome. But they can’t be written off as a useless doorstop. Despite flaws and financial industry bleating, sound new measures are taking shape.

Jun 27, 2011
via Breakingviews

Undead Tepco echoes U.S. housing zombies

Tokyo Electric Power is looking like an undead relative of America’s housing zombies. Shareholders of the Japanese utility meeting on Tuesday have seen the value of their holdings tumble 85 percent since the March earthquake caught them unawares, similar to the way the U.S. housing crunch eviscerated Fannie Mae  stock. Like those companies, it’s questionable whether Tepco’s next chapter involves public shareholders at all.

Tepco’s mess echoes that of Fannie and Freddie in significant ways. The utility — valued at 3.4 trillion yen ($42 billion) in early March, but now worth less than a sixth of that — is a central part of the industrial infrastructure underpinning Japan’s economy. The two U.S. mortgage giants boosted, and still support, America’s huge housing sector — though their shares, once worth well over $100 billion combined, are now essentially worthless.

    • About Richard

      "Richard Beales joined Breakingviews.com in 2007 from the Financial Times, where he was US markets editor and a Lex columnist. Prior to the FT, he spent more than 10 years as an investment banker, based largely in Hong Kong. He was a director in Citigroup’s mergers team, and before that head of Schroders’ regional project finance group. He has also lived briefly in Sydney, Australia, and began his working life in London at Mars & Co, a management consultancy, in 1989. Richard holds a masters in business journalism from New York University and a degree in biochemistry from St John’s ..."
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