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Jul 9, 2013
via Breakingviews

“Made in Italy, Owned Elsewhere” will have to do

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By Rob Cox

The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own.

Italian manufacturers have forever been proud to stamp a “Made in Italy” badge on their products. As much as a sign of quality, the boast stood as a mark of cultural and economic independence. But with Italy in the direst shape since World War II, “Made in Italy, Owned Elsewhere” will have to do for many of the nation’s industrialists.

Jun 26, 2013
via Breakingviews

Wall Street finds itself in a 1994 state of mind

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By Rob Cox
The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own.

Wall Street is obsessing about 1994. But it’s not nostalgia for Ace of Base or “Seinfeld” that has the financial industry atwitter - it’s turmoil in the bond market.

Jun 21, 2013
via Breakingviews

Salotto Buono’s dismantling hopeful sign for Italy

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By Rob Cox
The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own.

There are many reasons to worry about Italy’s prospects, but Mediobanca is no longer one. After nearly seven decades of playing the puppet master of Italian capitalism, the merchant bank that Enrico Cuccia built has announced an official retreat. It is the end of an era. Though Mediobanca’s power was already much diminished since Cuccia’s death in 2000, the new three-year business plan, unveiled on Friday in Milan, is a clear sign that corporate Italy, if not the state, is reforming.

Jun 7, 2013
via Breakingviews

Review: Hollywood blinds itself to Google’s faults

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By Rob Cox
The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own.

Rarely has a cinematic depiction of a business delivered as wet a kiss as “The Internship,” a new buddy film. Vince Vaughn and Owen Wilson play second fiddle to the real star: a silver screen version of Google’s corporate culture. The movie makes the Internet firm – unofficial motto: “Don’t be evil” – look less evil than is remotely plausible.

May 13, 2013
via Breakingviews

What Would Jamie Dimon Do?

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By Rob Cox

The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own.

What Would Jamie Dimon Do? That’s a question investors need to answer before voting to split the chairman and chief executive roles at JPMorgan’s annual meeting next week. The risk is that shareholders score a corporate governance point but lose Dimon. As a general rule, cutting off your nose to spite your face is a bad investment strategy.

May 13, 2013

Breakingviews: What Would Jamie Dimon Do?

(The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The
opinions expressed are his own)

By Rob Cox

NEW YORK, May 13 (Reuters Breakingviews) – What Would Jamie
Dimon Do? That’s a question investors need to answer before
voting to split the chairman and chief executive roles at
JPMorgan’s (JPM.N: Quote, Profile, Research) annual meeting next week. The risk is that
shareholders score a corporate governance point but lose Dimon.
As a general rule, cutting off your nose to spite your face is a
bad investment strategy.

May 7, 2013
via Breakingviews

It’s about good governance, not Jamie

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By Rob Cox
The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own.

Another day, another pressure point for JPMorgan. The latest rebuke of the U.S. bank’s board arrived on Tuesday from proxy adviser Glass Lewis, which like Institutional Shareholder Services helps investors make up their minds about how to vote at the annual meetings of companies. Both firms are now arguing for JPMorgan to split the roles of chairman and chief executive.

Apr 29, 2013
via Breakingviews

Chrysler value spat may offer Fiat silver lining

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By Rob Cox

The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own.

It took about a generation before Italian immigrants to the United States adopted the ways of their new home and shook off those of the old country. Italy’s premier industrial enterprise may do it in a matter of years. A spat over Fiat’s plans to fully acquire Chrysler, Detroit’s number three carmaker, could hasten the process.

Apr 23, 2013
via Events

As Coachella ages, the festival becomes self-sustaining

INDIO, Calif, – Once upon a time, there was a rock music festival held every April in the California desert whose meticulous curation of artists old and new made it the de facto tastemaker for the industry. Today, there is just Coachella. And although this three-day frolic in the sun may no longer be the most influential gathering of its kind, it has achieved something potentially even larger – an ability to sustain itself.

The three-day music marathon concluded its second weekend on Sunday, selling some 150,000 passes in total and making it the most-successful festival of its kind with gross receipts of about $50 million, according to Billboard. Almost 150 bands, musicians and performance artists made the trek to Indio, a scruffy suburb of Palm Springs, on two successive weekends to play on one of a half-dozen stages.

Mar 15, 2013
via The Great Debate

Who will be the Volvo of the firearms industry?

Who will be the Volvo of the firearms industry? For four decades until 1999, the Swedish carmaker led the world in making safety a virtue of its products. Its efforts paid off handsomely as sales and market share climbed, Volvo charged a premium for its vehicles and the company was eventually sold for $6.5 billion. The same could be done with guns.

Volvo’s timing was good. From its introduction of a little invention that became the modern seatbelt in 1958 to its sale some 40 golden years later to Ford Motor, public consciousness in automotive safety blossomed. Volvo’s technological lead gave it an edge over rivals who showed less interest in protecting passengers than revving up horsepower.

    • About Rob

      "Rob Cox helped establish Breakingviews in 2000 in London. From 2004 he spearheaded the firm's expansion in the United States and edited its American edition, including the daily Breakingviews columns in the New York Times and Wall Street Journal. Rob has worked as a financial journalist in London, Milan, New York, Washington, Chicago and Tokyo. Rob graduated from Columbia University’s Journalism School and the University of Vermont. Follow Rob on Twitter @rob1cox"
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