Robyn's Feed
Mar 26, 2015
via Breakingviews

ZTE’s turnaround not as impressive up close

Photo

ZTE smartphones Grand Memo Lite (L) and Grand S are displayed during a news conference in Taipei October 12, 2013. REUTERS/Pichi Chuang

The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are her own.

Mar 26, 2015
via Breakingviews

ZTE’s turnaround not as impressive up close

Photo

ZTE smartphones Grand Memo Lite (L) and Grand S are displayed during a news conference in Taipei October 12, 2013. REUTERS/Pichi Chuang

The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are her own.

Mar 24, 2015
via Breakingviews

Alibaba deal spree strains its financial strength

Photo

Alibaba Group Executive Chairman Jack Ma reacts while giving a speech at National Taiwan University in Taipei March 3, 2015. REUTERS/Pichi Chuang

The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are her own.

Mar 24, 2015
via Breakingviews

Alibaba deal spree strains its financial strength

Photo

Alibaba Group Executive Chairman Jack Ma reacts while giving a speech at National Taiwan University in Taipei March 3, 2015. REUTERS/Pichi Chuang

The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are her own.

Mar 4, 2015
via Breakingviews

JD.com tries Alibaba’s route to e-commerce profit

Photo

By Robyn Mak

The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are her own.

JD.com is following Alibaba’s route to e-commerce profit. Transactions on the group’s marketplace, which matches buyers to retailers, more than trebled in the fourth quarter, far outstripping growth in the group’s direct sales business. Acting as a middleman, like the larger Alibaba, may offer better margins. Though earnings are still absent, they are starting to look less elusive.

Mar 3, 2015
via Breakingviews

Alibaba’s split nationalities invite trouble

Photo

By Robyn Mak

The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are her own.

Alibaba’s multiple nationalities are an invitation to trouble. Taiwan has challenged the e-commerce group’s status as a non-Chinese company. The regulators could be forgiven for being confused. Chinese tax authorities regard Alibaba as a company with its main base in Hong Kong, licensing bodies see China, while investors see the Cayman Islands. The ambiguity may not always be beneficial.

Feb 13, 2015
via Breakingviews

China web metrics add up to little for investors

Photo

By Robyn Mak

The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are her own.

Economists already know that big numbers stop being useful when they become targets. That law now also applies to China’s technology companies. Rival groups like Alibaba and JD.com bandy around statistics like “gross merchandise volume” that are highly subjective. As China’s internet matures, numbers like these will go from confusing to irrelevant.

Feb 13, 2015
via Breakingviews

China web metrics add up to little for investors

Photo

By Robyn Mak

The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are her own.

Economists already know that big numbers stop being useful when they become targets. That law now also applies to China’s technology companies. Rival groups like Alibaba and JD.com bandy around statistics like “gross merchandise volume” that are highly subjective. As China’s internet matures, numbers like these will go from confusing to irrelevant.

Feb 10, 2015
via Breakingviews

China pulls its punches with Qualcomm settlement

Photo

By Robyn Mak

The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own.

China has held back with its Qualcomm settlement. The country’s antitrust watchdogs hit the U.S. chipmaker with a $975 million fine on Feb. 9 and forced it to lower patent fees. That’s helpful for local smartphone makers that rely on Qualcomm’s third and fourth generation mobile technology. Yet the resolution stopped short of explicitly curbing the tech giant’s dominance in the country. Big as China is, it can’t yet afford to shut out foreign technology.

Feb 10, 2015
via Breakingviews

China pulls its punches with Qualcomm settlement

Photo

By Robyn Mak

The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own.

China has held back with its Qualcomm settlement. The country’s antitrust watchdogs hit the U.S. chipmaker with a $975 million fine on Feb. 9 and forced it to lower patent fees. That’s helpful for local smartphone makers that rely on Qualcomm’s third and fourth generation mobile technology. Yet the resolution stopped short of explicitly curbing the tech giant’s dominance in the country. Big as China is, it can’t yet afford to shut out foreign technology.