Lunchtime Links 7-28

July 28, 2009

(send links, pics, vids to optionarmageddon at gmail)

Tenacious G (NY Mag)  Another good article on Goldman.  Most useful is the commentary regarding the $13 billion AIG collateral payments and the $28 billion worth of FDIC-guaranteed debt.  Without those bailouts, Goldman would be gone.  I’d always thought that was true.  Helpful to have confirmation.

Argentina’s first couple deliver prosperity–for themselves (Guardian)

China tells U.S. to manage flood of dollars with care (Reuters)  Tim Geithner is in China with Hillary Clinton this week.  Top of the agenda is convincing the Chinese we’re actually really serious about getting the deficit under control, but not until 2013.

Treasurys lower as record auctions begin (Marketwatch)  Meanwhile, Treasury is selling a record $235 billion of bills and notes this week.  Beware of stimulus proponents who cite stagnant yields as evidence that increased issuance isn’t a problem.  A key problem with that argument is that “real” interest rates are at their highest level in a while.  Point being, deflation be driving rates lower if it weren’t for the flood of debt sales.

18 TARP recipients that skipped paying dividends to Treasury (SNL)  Four of the banks have substantial assets.  (ht MJ)

SEC issues new rules to limit naked shorting (SEC)  Ugh.  As with CDS, the regulatory response is falling short.

Blue M&Ms mend spinal injuries (Telegraph)  Who thought up this experiment?

Scientist: How cooking sets us apart from apes (NPR)  I find this fascinating.

Color-blindness simulator (webexhibits)  Simulates the different types of color-blindness.

Abstinence-only lunch program ineffective at combating obesity (The Onion)

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