Lunchtime Links 11-8

November 8, 2009

The economics of trust (Harford, Forbes) A great article. I’ve argued that markets need rules because without them the division of labor breaks down.

Big bank break up idea gains ground in Congress (Drawbaugh, Reuters) Senator Sanders just introduced a bill to do that. As noted earlier, Kanjorski is working on amendment to do same.

Treasury to block sale of Fannie Mae tax credits to Goldman (Reuters)

Hedge fund giant surfaces in insider trading probe (Pulliam, WSJ) Steve Cohen’s SAC Capital is now under the microscope.

Einhorn: first let’s kill all CDS (NakedCapitalsim) The post refers to comments from Einhorn’s speech at VIC, but expands on it nicely, arguing among other things, that these financial weapons of mass destruction probably can’t be made safe no matter how aggressively you regulate them…

Michael Jackson’s father seeks allowance from dead son’s estate (BBC) His expenses are $20k per month, but he only gets $1700 from Social Security.

Why doesn’t exercise lead to weight loss? (Reynolds, NYT)

A symbol of the resilience of all indigenous people (TED) A great video, but the best tidbit begins at the 19:00 minute mark…

Jim Chanos, famed short-seller, not a fan of munis (Sullivan, Barron’s)

Comments

Rolf what are your views in the CDS market? Too big and complex to worry about, too big to fail or a financial end of world nuclear bomb?

Posted by wondering | Report as abusive
 

Regarding CDS … why haven’t these things just died on their own because of their deficiencies? I’m by no means an expert, but, as I understand it, one side of these things (is it the buyer or the seller?) is very likely to blow up.So why are the people on that side of the deal still there? It’s not like it’s a secret anymore that these things are financial WMDs.

Posted by John | Report as abusive
 

Fat bonuses result in thin people. Consolidation of smaller and community institutions result in middleweight fighters, in any playing field.

Posted by Casper | Report as abusive
 

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