Lunchtime Links 2-18

February 18, 2010

Reader note: off on vacation the next few days so posting will be light. But LOTS of great links today….2 days of reading here!

Must Read – Volcker’s rules: DOA (Pethokoukis, Reuters) It appears the administration was never seriously considering a big push to get the “Volcker Rules” limiting bank size and proprietary trading added to financial reform legislation. My colleague Jimmy P. has a pithy, incisive analysis of what’s happening.

Must ReadHow JP Morgan treats its clients, scandalously and in bad faith (Felix) Great find from Felix. Judge Rakoff is at it again, this time ruling against JP Morgan, which Rakoff says acted in bad faith. “The gist is that JP Morgan took one of its longest-standing clients in Mexico — Grupo Televisa — and tried to hand all of its secrets over to its biggest rival, Carlos Slim. And the way it tried to do that was by selling Slim a loan larded up with covenants which would essentially force Televisa to reveal any and all information to the holder of the debt.”

China sells Treasurys….or did they? (EconompicData) Great post. The WSJ follows their lead today.

Stripping away the disguise of derivatives (Das, FT) Explaining how derivatives can be used to mask debt. Not a long piece, but read slowly if you’re not familiar with the terms.

Treasury Secretary would lead new systemic risk council (Chan, NYT) The idea that a systemic risk council will help avert crises is foolish when you think about it. None of the regulators that will be on the council has done a very good job “leaning against the wind” in the past.  Yet together they are going to be able to not only reach consensus about systemically risk firms, but actually take corrective action?

IMF to sell 191 tons of gold on open market (Pardomuan/Wroughton, Reuters) It sold 400 tons not long ago, half of which was scooped up by India. Gold still makes sense in the long-run as insurance against a dollar crisis, but with the dollar likely to get stronger in the short run on the back of continued debt problems in Europe, it may be possible to add to gold positions below $1,000…

Ackman may make $170 million on grand-slam General Growth bet (Taub/Burton, Bloomberg) And he could make much more if Simon ups its bid or another bidder emerges at a price higher than Simon’s offer of $9. The market expects a higher price in the end, what with the shares trading near $13. Ackman bought his for 46¢! He’s said the shares are worth at least $24, but with the cash component of Simon’s offer just $6, it would make sense to take some profits…

Goldman’s Rococo PR prince (Abelson, NY Observer)

States sink in benefits hole (Merrick, WSJ) As of June 30, 2008 the 50 states collectively faced a $1 trillion funding deficit between what they’ve promised to public sector retirees and the funds they’ve actually set aside. And the data were collected before the bottom fell out of the market, so the gap is likely worse. Keep this in mind when liberal economists try to explain away the federal debt as manageable. If banks got bailouts, you can bet public sector employees will, so consider these funding gaps as obligations of the federal government…

Muni threat: Cities weigh Chapter 9 (Dugan/Maher, WSJ) It isn’t just states facing budget trouble.

Feather starfish swimming (Youtube) Wow.

Gadget Noir…

qQ4wx

One comment

We welcome comments that advance the story through relevant opinion, anecdotes, links and data. If you see a comment that you believe is irrelevant or inappropriate, you can flag it to our editors by using the report abuse links. Views expressed in the comments do not represent those of Reuters. For more information on our comment policy, see http://blogs.reuters.com/fulldisclosure/2010/09/27/toward-a-more-thoughtful-conversation-on-stories/

We already know that Obama was really born in Iran, or Indonesia or India…wherever. But what I want to know – is it true that at one time he worked for Goldman?

Posted by Chicagoboy | Report as abusive

[...] View full post on Rolfe Winkler [...]

[...] Treasury Update: it looks like the WSJ (hat tip Rolfe Winkler) picked up the story and explains the [...]