Television Journalist, New York
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Sep 8, 2010
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Lockheed Martin bracing for a new reality

Lockheed Martin CEO Robert Stevens says despite cost cutting, the defense industry will survive based on new global security needs and adds that Lockheed’s portfolio is well positioned for change.

May 20, 2010
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Is Apple in Intel’s future?

Apple developed the processor for it’s recently launched iPad tablet PC in-house. Intel was left waiting on the sidelines but change may be in store. Future tablets from other device makers, and maybe even Apple, could prove to be a lucrative for the world’s largest chipmaker. And why not, Intel already makes the microprocessors that are used in more than three quarters of the world’s PCs. Tom Kilroy, Intel senior vice president and general manager of sales and marketing, says “wait til Computex” for a big announcement. So, what’s likely to come out of the industry trade show this June in Taipei? Any thoughts? Click below to hear what Kilroy had to say in San Francisco at the 2010 Reuters Global Technology Summit.

Intel on Tablet Opportunities from Reuters TV on Vimeo.

Apr 23, 2010
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Reuters set to spotlight financial regulation in DC

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The fight over new rules that will dramatically change Wall Street and financial markets is approaching the finish line in Washington, with both lawmakers and the financial industry making last-ditch efforts to put their stamp on the reform effort. Reuters will be hearing from the key players in the debate on April 26-29 during the 2010 Global Financial Regulation Summit.

Top regulators, watchdogs, lawmakers and stakeholders will provide their perspectives on how this landmark legislation will impact banks, investors, traders and consumers. The talks will focus in on proposals for a strong new consumer agency, strict oversight of derivatives and attempts to end the perception that some financial firms are “too big to fail.”

Apr 23, 2010
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Reuters set to spotlight financial regulation in DC


The fight over new rules that will dramatically change Wall Street and financial markets is approaching the finish line in Washington, with both lawmakers and the financial industry making last-ditch efforts to put their stamp on the reform effort. Reuters will be hearing from the key players in the debate on April 26-29 during the 2010 Reuters Global Financial Regulation Summit.

Top regulators, watchdogs, lawmakers and stakeholders will provide their perspectives on how this landmark legislation will impact banks, investors, traders and consumers. The talks will focus in on proposals for a strong new consumer agency, strict oversight of derivatives and attempts to end the perception that some financial firms are “too big to fail.”

Apr 23, 2010
via Summit Notebook

Reuters set to spotlight financial regulation in DC


The fight over new rules that will dramatically change Wall Street and financial markets is approaching the finish line in Washington, with both lawmakers and the financial industry making last-ditch efforts to put their stamp on the reform effort. Reuters will be hearing from the key players in the debate on April 26-29 during the 2010 Reuters Global Financial Regulation Summit.

Top regulators, watchdogs, lawmakers and stakeholders will provide their perspectives on how this landmark legislation will impact banks, investors, traders and consumers. The talks will focus in on proposals for a strong new consumer agency, strict oversight of derivatives and attempts to end the perception that some financial firms are “too big to fail.”

Mar 26, 2010
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Avoiding another financial crisis

The Global Exchanges & Trading Summit takes place as lawmakers and regulators craft new rules to avoid a repeat of the financial crisis. The rising chorus for more transparency in capital markets could drive a host of new derivatives to exchanges and clearinghouses, propelling them out of the recession, but growing calls for a clampdown on speculation and automated trading could hit some of the world’s most powerful dealers and investors, undercutting the exchanges that rely on them. High-frequency trading is behind much of the spike in volumes over the last year, but as volatility drops from crisis-era highs, traders of all kinds are forced to reevaluate strategies, and exchanges are maneuvering to attract that business. A couple years after a period of blockbuster mergers, investors wonder whether the heavyweight exchange operators are angling for another round. Join us March 29-31 as we ask some of the biggest players in the industry to share their insights and outlook for the industry at the Reuters Global Exchanges and Trading Summit which will take place in New York, London, Hong Kong.

Mar 19, 2010
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Economic security or environmental destruction?


The Oil Sands, the world’s second-largest proven reserves after Saudi Arabia, hold out the promise of energy security for the United States and economic security for Canada. But environmentalists fear the destructive, energy intensive process of extracting the oil will carry direct consequences for the planet. Despite the doubts, new oil sands projects are again springing up after the financial crisis halted development. How will oil companies balance the quest for more oil with environmental concerns? Mar. 22-23 we’ll put those questions to the oil companies, environmental groups and government officals at the first Reuters Canadian Oil Sands Summit in Calgary.

Mar 12, 2010
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Will growth in the food industry spur inflation?

Food and agriculture companies, having weathered the global economic meltdown, are now facing the prospects that renewed growth will spur renewed inflation.
With costs poised to rise for commodities like wheat and already high for items like sugar and cocoa, packaged foods makers face the task of trying to preserve profits at a time while retailers and consumers are balking at price increases.
Trade battles over U.S. meat and regulatory issues like a tax on soft drinks and push for more accurate disclosure of calories and fat on restaurant boards and food package are also concerns for the industry.

Mar 8, 2010
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Would the last person to leave the smelter please turn out the lights?

For UC RUSAL, one simple act is crucial to reducing costs.
Bonuses for managers at the world’s largest aluminium company
depend on the company’s 75,000 workers heeding the message.
“We have to introduce a new culture: if you leave the
office, turn off the lights,” Artyom Volynets, UC RUSAL’s deputy
chief executive for strategy, said at Reuters Global Mining and
Steel Summit on Monday.
“We have 16 smelters, each with their own headquarters and
offices. We employ 75,000 people. If each one of them is
switching off the lights at the end of their shift, that would
help tremendously.”
UC RUSAL embarked on a major drive to slash production costs
last year as part of an ultimately successful attempt to secure
Russia’s largest ever private sector debt restructuring.
Easy access to Siberian hydroelectric power, compared with
relatively high-cost coal used to power smelters in other parts
of the world, affords UC RUSAL a distinct cost advantage when
making aluminium used in transport, construction and packaging.
In the first half of 2009, it cost UC RUSAL an average
$1,400 to produce a tonne of aluminium. The metal is now selling
at above $2,200 a tonne.
UC RUSAL has cut costs by sourcing cheaper raw materials of
better quality and improving throughput rates at its smelters in
Siberia, which account for about 80 percent of its total output.
But cheap power in Siberia had also led to complacency.
“Our smelters are located in probably the only remaining
major energy-long region in the world. Therefore, if you buy
power at 2 cents per kilowatt, you don’t really care how much
you spend,” Volynets said.
“For my colleagues on the operational side of the business,
their key performance indicators are 100 percent tied to cost
improvements,” he said. “They will not be compensated if these
improvements are not implemented.”
(Writing by Robin Paxton in Moscow)

Mar 5, 2010
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2010 Global Mining and Steel Outlook

This time last year, steel mills and base metal miners were in an unprecedented slump, with metal prices bouncing off multi-year lows amid steep economic downturn. Since then, the world economy has turned upwards and demand for metal is resurging. While many analysts have cited economic recovery for the price gains, they add that demand signals show only slow, choppy growth. Whether metal prices have gained as investors search for a place to put excess liquidity or are based in solid supply/demand fundamentals remains a question. Get exclusive insight into the sector from the Reuters Global Mining and Steel Summit taking place in New York, London and Sydney on Mar 8-11.

    • About Ruben

      "Ruben Ramirez is a Reporter and Producer at Reuters Television covering business and financial news. He is based in New York. Ramirez has reported for Reuters around the world. Prior to joining Reuters, Ramirez was a producer at CNN and CNN Financial News. While at CNN, Ramirez was part of the network's Emmy-Award winning coverage of 9/11. Before that, he was a writer and segment producer at CNBC. Ramirez studied Finance and Broadcast Journalism at Boston University."
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