Asia – A Week in Pictures 10 October 2010

October 11, 2010

North Korea opened its doors and the internet to the World’s media to allow a glimpse of the parade which marked the 65th anniversary of the founding of the Workers’ Party. More importantly, it gave the world its first independent look at the protege Kim Jong-un. China based Chief Photographer Petar Kujundzic took full advantage of the opportunity.  The warmth of the picture of the women soldiers smiling – a rare glimpse into the world from which we normally only get formal, over compressed and pixelated images.

KOREA-NORTH/

North Korean female soldiers smile before a parade to commemorate the 65th anniversary of the founding of the Workers’ Party of Korea in Pyongyang October 10, 2010. REUTERS/Petar Kujundzic

KOREA-NORTH/

Female North Korean soldiers march during a military parade to commemorate the 65th anniversary of founding of the Workers’ Party of Korea in Pyongyang October 10, 2010. Secretive North Korea’s leader-in-waiting, the youngest son of ailing ruler Kim Jong-il, took centre stage during a massive military parade on Sunday, appearing live for the first time in public.      REUTERS/Petar Kujundzic

 KOREA-NORTH/

North Korean leader Kim Jong-il (R) looks at his youngest son Kim Jong-un as they watch a parade to commemorate the 65th anniversary of founding of the Workers’ Party of Korea in Pyongyang October 10, 2010. Secretive North Korea’s leader-in-waiting, the youngest son of ailing ruler Kim Jong-il, took centre stage during a massive military parade on Sunday, appearing live for the first time in public.    REUTERS/Petar Kujundzic

At the risk of appearing to throw stones into the dark and murky waters of succession, I will move directly from Kim Jong-un to Prince Charles.  I want to highlight this affectionate picture of Britain’s heir to the throne by Sunil Verma. A perfectly timed image with legs, arms and delicately held umbrellas all leading the eye round and round in a dance of gentle enjoyment.

 INDIA

Britain’s Prince Charles dances with villagers at Tolasar village near Jodhpur in India’s state of Rajasthan October 5, 2010.  REUTERS/Sunil Verma

Sports have featured heavily in this week’s report. The Commonwealth Games in Delhi has settled into a rhythm that the organisers will be happy with – shame that many of the events are devoid of fans. Tim, who is at the pool, shot a classic image of a dome of water just before it breaks as the swimmer’s head emerges from under the water.  I have seen this done many times during breast stroke races but rarely with back stroke. The F1 qualifying in Suzuka was postponed due to driving rain and then produced a spectacular race crash, the pictures sending a cold shiver of memories of first turn indecision down my spine – do I shoot wide or tight? If I shoot tight I might not get it all in or even worse not even see it all, or if I shoot wide I might muzz it or it will be too much of a pull. Kato-san gets it just about right. Breaking all the rules of not moving square pictures (and what are rules for?), Andrew Caballero-Reynolds captures the Champagne moment of sheer joy as Tendulkar is out. The arms of the bowler, Tendulkar’s bat and jumping feet forming an almost perfect X in the abstract design of the image. Lastly, to one of my least favourite sports, don’t know why but just can’t get excited by it, tennis. I have seen many “balls over the face” pictures from tennis but this one is just perfect, the pulse rate raised by a great moment from Yuriko.

GAMES

James Goddard of England competes in the men’s 200m backstroke swimming heats during the Commonwealth Games in New Delhi October 6, 2010. REUTERS/Tim Wimborne

MOTOR-RACING-PRIX/

Debris flies as Ferrari Formula One driver Felipe Massa of Brazil (L) and Force India Formula One driver Vitantonio Liuzzi of Italy spin out after colliding on the first bend during Japanese F1 Grand Prix at the Suzuka circuit October 10, 2010. REUTERS/Issei Kato

CRICKET-AUSTRALIA/

Australia’s Doug Bollinger shouts as he jumps in the air after dismissing India’s Sachin Tendulkar (L) on the fifth day of their first test cricket match in Mohali October 5, 2010.  REUTERS/Andrew Caballero-Reynolds

TENNIS-MEN/

Gael Monfils of France returns the ball to Radek Stepanek of Czech Republic during the semi-finals match at the Japan Open tennis championships in Tokyo October 9, 2010.  REUTERS/Yuriko Nakao

Pakistan has seen a series of attacks on fuel convoys bound for US led forces in Afghanistan as fighting intensifies. The boundaries between Pakistan and Afghanistan blur further with Taliban bombings countered with US drone and helicopter attacks. Pakistan Chief Photographer Adrees Latif and Peshawar based photographer Fayaz Aziz produced an apocalyptic series of pictures; fingers of flames pour from the bullet holes in the sides of fuel tankers, the futile waves of police directing traffic;  a man standing in the middle of the street dressed in a perfectly white shalwar kameez looking at Adrees as if he is posing for a family picture while fires rage behind him; a boy with a pack on his back looks as if he is heading off to school, “have a nice day at school, don’t forget to hand in your homework and try to avoid the inferno of the fuel trucks” . Fayaz’s picture of the driver sitting by the charred skeleton of his truck, his life in ruins, day to day living just got worse. Which of course brings us to the floods, they haven’t gone away, millions still displaced and struggling to put their lives together. Akhtar’s picture of the tear-stained face of the boy glowering, his eyes saying that he has got a lot to be angry about and it’s not getting any better for him.

PAKISTAN-NATO/

Police point towards residents to get off the GT road as burning fuel pours through the bullet holes in tankers near Nowshera, located in Pakistan’s Khyber-Pakhtunkhwa Province October 7, 2010. Gunmen in Pakistan set fire to up to 40 supply trucks for NATO troops in Afghanistan on Wednesday, police said.    REUTERS/Adrees Latif

PAKISTAN-NATO/

A local resident stands on the street median as he watches fuel tankers burn along the GT road in Nowshera, located in Pakistan’s Khyber-Pakhtunkhwa Province October 7, 2010. Gunmen in Pakistan set fire to up to 40 supply trucks for NATO troops in Afghanistan on Wednesday, police said.    REUTERS/Adrees Latif

PAKISTAN-NATO/

A school boy, wearing a backpack, walks past burning fuel tankers along the GT road in Nowshera, located in Pakistan’s Khyber-Pakhtunkhwa Province October 7, 2010. Gunmen in Pakistan set fire to up to 40 supply trucks for NATO troops in Afghanistan on Wednesday, police said.    REUTERS/Adrees Latif

PAKISTAN/

Truck driver Haji Kareem Jan sits next to his fuel tanker meant for NATO troops, which was set on fire by gunmen, along the GT road in Nowshera in Pakistan’s Khyber-Pakhtunkhwa Province October 8, 2010.  REUTERS/Fayaz Aziz

PAKISTAN-FLOODS/

Two-year-old Imam Bux, who has been displaced by flooding, cries outside his family’s tent while taking refuge in a relief camp for flood victims in Kakar village, some 26 kilometres (16 miles) from Dadu in Pakistan’s Sindh province, October 6, 2010. REUTERS/Akhtar Soomro

From Malaysia, Bazuki has managed to make me think twice in one week “why would anyone do that?” A while ago, I was slightly disgusted by a woman who was sharing a soft whipped ice-cream with her dog, lick by lick, but kissing a King Cobra…man! The square shape of the picture calms me down. Next, base jumping, Daniel Smith’s eyes are wide open and he looks calm; even thinking about where Bazuki is standing to shoot this picture is making me feel sick. How can Daniel Smith look calm? Imagine jumping off the building with minimal time for a parachute to open, no need to imagine, just look at the picture. Maybe someone can explain to me why he is wearing a helmet?

MALAYSIA/

Snake charmer Faizal Ahmad kisses a King Cobra during a snake show at the National Museum in Kuala Lumpur October 6, 2010. REUTERS/Bazuki Muhammad

MALAYSIA/

BASE jumper Daniel Smith of Sydney leaps before parachuting down from Kuala Lumpur Tower in Malaysia’s capital of Kuala Lumpur October 7, 2010. REUTERS/Bazuki Muhammad

The last three pictures get a mention in this weekly round up for three different reasons. The first, from China, an optical illusion makes you think at first glace that everyone is pushing as hard as they can to refloat the boat; have a closer look at the man on the left – obvious potential management material and I would lay bets it’s his boat too. The second, a magnificent example from Kim of capturing a strong image from the driest of subjects, businessmen at a forum. The last picture, from South Korea, just makes me smile and think of the bawdy pantomime chant of “he’s behind you!” The man in camouflage blissfully unaware of the near naked green painted man who doesn’t look too jolly, or giant but is certainly green.

CHINA-FLOODING/

Fishermen try to push a stranded boat back to the sea at Tanmen port in Qionghai, Hainan province, October 8, 2010. Torrential rains have submerged more than 1,000 villages in the subtropical Chinese island of Hainan, home to much of the country’s rubber plantations, the Xinhua news agency said. REUTERS/China Daily

JAPAN

Panasonic Corporation President Fumio Ohtsubo attends its ‘eco ideas’ Forum 2010 in Tokyo October 6, 2010.    REUTERS/Kim Kyung-Hoon

KOREA/

Performers covered in body paint wander around the streets during their street performance “Coloured People” as part of the Hi Seoul Festival 2010 in central Seoul October 4, 2010. The festival is an annual cultural event which includes international non-verbal performances such as circus acts, mimes and puppet shows. Events will take place on the streets of Seoul and will run from October 2-10.  REUTERS/Truth Leem

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