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Jan 16, 2013

NRA gets personal with Obama in new anti-gun control ad

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – Hours before President Barack Obama was due to unveil proposals on Wednesday to prevent mass shootings like the one in Newtown, Connecticut, last month, the National Rifle Association released an advertisement that referred to his two school-aged daughters.

“Are the president’s kids more important than yours?” a narrator says in the 35-second television and Internet spot. “Then why is he skeptical about putting armed security in our schools when his kids are protected by armed guards at their schools? Mr. Obama demands the wealthy pay their fair share of taxes, but he’s just another elitist hypocrite when it comes to a fair share of security.”

Jan 10, 2013

Pastor attacked for anti-gay speech pulls out of inauguration

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – The pastor selected to deliver the benediction at President Barack Obama’s inauguration withdrew from the ceremony on Thursday after being attacked for making anti-gay comments.

Rev. Louie Giglio, an Atlanta minister, called homosexuality a sin in a mid-1990s sermon and warned against the gay rights movement, the liberal website ThinkProgress reported on Wednesday.

Jan 7, 2013

For Obama’s second inauguration, a subdued, less crowded Washington

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – It is one of those occasions that is quintessential Washington: the inauguration of a president, a multi-day festival of patriotism, politics, optimism and self-congratulation.

All of that will be on display on January 21, when President Barack Obama is publicly sworn in for his second four-year term. But this inauguration will be far less grand than Obama’s first in 2009, when a record 1.8 million visitors flooded the city to see the nation’s first black president take office.

Dec 26, 2012

For Obama’s second inauguration, a subdued, less crowded Washington

WASHINGTON, Dec 26 (Reuters) – It is one of those occasions
that is quintessential Washington: the inauguration of a
president, a multi-day festival of patriotism, politics,
optimism and self-congratulation.

All of that will be on display on Jan. 21, when President
Barack Obama is publicly sworn in for his second four-year term.
But this inauguration will be far less grand than Obama’s first
in 2009, when a record 1.8 million visitors flooded the city to
see the nation’s first black president take office.

Dec 9, 2012

On the edge of the “cliff,” U.S. cities like Charleston

CHARLESTON, South Carolina (Reuters) – For 37 years straight, Joseph P. Riley Jr. has sat behind the mayor’s desk here, shaping this city and its budget.

On a recent afternoon, Riley, 69, reached for a draft copy of next year’s spending plan and wondered aloud about what might get cut should politicians in Washington fail to find an agreement this month, unleashing $600 billion worth of spending reductions and tax hikes next year.

Nov 8, 2012

Republican strategist Karl Rove’s very bad night

WASHINGTON, Nov 7 (Reuters) – As television networks began
declaring that President Barack Obama had won re-election, the
most captivating televised drama Tuesday evening played out on
Fox News, where Republican strategist Karl Rove refused to
believe the race between Obama and Mitt Romney was over.

“I think this is premature,” said Rove, a former senior
adviser to George W. Bush and architect of Bush’s two successful
runs for the White House.

Nov 7, 2012

With the help of women, Obama wins a second term

WASHINGTON, Nov 7 (Reuters) – In the final week of the U.S.
presidential campaign, one advertisement was on heavy rotation
in the swing state of Wisconsin. It featured three women named
Connie, Kim, and Anita who told viewers the reasons they were
switching their support from President Barack Obama to Mitt
Romney.

The Republican campaign hoped that women throughout America
would follow the lead of that trio, but Obama was able to
preserve his coalition of female voters en route to winning a
second term on Tuesday.

Nov 7, 2012

In Ohio, Obama cut into Romney’s advantage among white men

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – On his road to re-election, President Barack Obama had one group that proved most difficult to woo of all: white men. But in the end, the first African-American president was able to withstand a flight of white male voters from his campaign where it mattered most.

Obama saw his support among the country’s second-largest voting group – white women are the largest – decline from 41 percent in 2008 to 36 percent in 2012. His gap in support among white men ballooned from 16 percentage points when he defeated Republican John McCain in 2008, to 21 percentage points in Tuesday’s contest against Republican Mitt Romney, according to Reuters/Ipsos Election Day polling.

Nov 7, 2012

Profile – Paul Ryan, the loser with a future

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – Paul Ryan may have taken a punch. But Tuesday night was far from a definitive blow for Mitt Romney’s hard-driving presidential running mate, a veteran of Congress who according to one admirer is “just getting started.”

History hasn’t been kind to losing vice presidential candidates. Only two have gone on to become presidents themselves. The last two failed running mates were Sarah Palin and John Edwards – one went on to a reality television show, the other’s personal life turned out to be fit for a soap opera.

Nov 7, 2012

Paul Ryan, the loser with a future

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – Paul Ryan may have taken a punch. But Tuesday night was far from a definitive blow for Mitt Romney’s hard-driving presidential running mate, a veteran of Congress who according to one admirer is “just getting started.”

History hasn’t been kind to losing vice presidential candidates. Only two have gone on to become presidents themselves. The last two failed running mates were Sarah Palin and John Edwards – one went on to a reality television show, the other’s personal life turned out to be fit for a soap opera.

    • About Samuel

      "Sam is a Reuters correspondent covering the 2012 campaign. Previously, he was an associate editor at Newsweek and a staff reporter for The Daily Beast. His writing has also appeared in The Boston Globe and The New York Observer."
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