Samia's Feed
Jun 29, 2015

Syrian insurgents carve out fiefdoms in de-facto partition

BEIRUT (Reuters) – Four years into a war that has killed more than 220,000 people, Syrian President Bashar al-Assad can no longer defend the whole country or hope to regain lost territory and his forces are retreating and fortifying their core strongholds, from the capital Damascus up to the coastal strip in north-western Syria.

At the same time, the main blocs of insurgents, Islamic State in the east, a rival Islamist alliance in the northwest, nationalist rebels in the south and Kurds in the north are carving out their own fiefdoms in what looks like the de facto partition of Syria.

Jun 29, 2015

Insight – Syrian insurgents carve out fiefdoms in de-facto partition

BEIRUT (Reuters) – Four years into a war that has killed more than 220,000 people, Syrian President Bashar al-Assad can no longer defend the whole country or hope to regain lost territory and his forces are retreating and fortifying their core strongholds, from the capital Damascus up to the coastal strip in north-western Syria.

At the same time, the main blocs of insurgents, Islamic State in the east, a rival Islamist alliance in the northwest, nationalist rebels in the south and Kurds in the north are carving out their own fiefdoms in what looks like the de facto partition of Syria.

Jun 18, 2015
via FaithWorld

Saddam’s former army is secret of success for Baghdadi’s Islamic State

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(Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi in  his first public appearance at a mosque in tIraq’s second city, Mosul, according to a video posted on the Internet on July 5, 2014, in this still image taken from the video.  REUTERS/Social Media Website via Reuters TV)

A year after declaring his caliphate, it is clear that the secret of Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi’s success is the army and state he has built from the remnants of Saddam Hussein’s military, and the allegiance he has won or coerced from alienated Sunni Muslims in Iraq, Syria, and beyond.

Jun 16, 2015

Saddam’s former army is secret of Baghdadi’s success

BEIRUT (Reuters) – A year after declaring his caliphate, it is clear that the secret of Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi’s success is the army and state he has built from the remnants of Saddam Hussein’s military, and the allegiance he has won or coerced from alienated Sunni Muslims in Iraq, Syria, and beyond.

In that year, the self-appointed caliph has expanded his turf from eastern Syria and western Iraq to include adherents in pockets of war-racked Libya and Egypt’s lawless Sinai peninsula.

Jun 16, 2015

Insight – Saddam’s former army is secret of Baghdadi’s success

BEIRUT (Reuters) – A year after declaring his caliphate, it is clear that the secret of Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi’s success is the army and state he has built from the remnants of Saddam Hussein’s military, and the allegiance he has won or coerced from alienated Sunni Muslims in Iraq, Syria, and beyond.

In that year, the self-appointed caliph has expanded his turf from eastern Syria and western Iraq to include adherents in pockets of war-racked Libya and Egypt’s lawless Sinai peninsula.

May 27, 2015
via FaithWorld

Islamic State expands its ‘state’, closing Sunni alternatives to jihadis

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(May 25, 2015 update of map of Syria and Iraq showing the areas controlled by Islamic State. Locates cities Palmyra and Ramadi/REUTERS)

Almost a year after Islamic State’s shock capture of Mosul, Iraq’s second city, the black flags of the jihadis have been raised over Ramadi, the capital of Anbar province to the west of Baghdad, seat of Iraq’s increasingly theoretical central government.

May 22, 2015

Insight – Islamic State expands its ‘state’

BEIRUT (Reuters) – Almost a year after Islamic State’s shock capture of Mosul, Iraq’s second city, the black flags of the jihadis have been raised over Ramadi, the capital of Anbar province to the west of Baghdad, seat of Iraq’s increasingly theoretical central government.

Nobody talks of Mosul or recapturing it from Islamic State. It is a forgotten city. Now it is all about the fall of Ramadi, the neighbouring ancient Syrian city of Palmyra in central Syria and beyond – the Libyan city of Sirte, hometown of former leader Muammar Gaddafi.

May 22, 2015

Islamic State expands its ‘state’

BEIRUT (Reuters) – Almost a year after Islamic State’s shock capture of Mosul, Iraq’s second city, the black flags of the jihadis have been raised over Ramadi, the capital of Anbar province to the west of Baghdad, seat of Iraq’s increasingly theoretical central government.

Nobody talks of Mosul or recapturing it from Islamic State. It is a forgotten city. Now it is all about the fall of Ramadi, the neighbouring ancient Syrian city of Palmyra in central Syria and beyond – the Libyan city of Sirte, hometown of former leader Muammar Gaddafi.

May 21, 2015

Hezbollah sees no end to Syria war, Mideast at risk of partition

BEIRUT (Reuters) – Lebanon’s Hezbollah says the Middle East is at risk of partition and sees no end to the war in Syria, where it is fighting alongside President Bashar al-Assad against insurgents supported by his regional enemies.

Sheikh Naim Qassem, deputy leader of the Iranian-backed group, said the insurgents would be unable to topple the Assad government despite their recent gains in battle, including this week’s capture of Palmyra by the Islamic State jihadist group.

Mar 27, 2015
via FaithWorld

Iran expands its regional ‘empire’ ahead of nuclear deal

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(Shi’ite Muslim rebels hold up their weapons during a rally against air strikes in Sanaa March 26, 2015. REUTERS/Khaled Abdullah)

With Iran moving closer to a deal with world powers to constrain its nuclear program in return for an end to sanctions, Arab analysts and leaders are focused more on how Tehran is working unconstrained to tighten its grip on Arab states, from Iraq to Lebanon, and Syria to Yemen.