Samia's Feed
Mar 13, 2011

Analysis: As world talks, time running out for Libya rebels

LONDON (Reuters) – By the time the outside world agrees on a response to Libyan leader Muammar Gaddafi’s bloody onslaught against a popular revolt, it could all be over.

The advance of Gaddafi’s better-armed forces, who seem to have shown little regard for civilians when storming in to retake rebel strongholds, has outrun the slow pace of hesitant initiatives being discussed by European, U.S. and Arab leaders.

Mar 11, 2011

Libyan scholar urges help for rebels fighting Gaddafi

LONDON (Reuters) – An influential Libyan scholar urged world powers on Friday to recognize the rebel National Libyan Council, supply it with weapons and impose a no-fly zone to ground Muammar Gaddafi’s warplanes.

Sheikh Ali al-Salabi, one of Libya’s most prominent Islamic scholars, also asked Arab leaders meeting in Cairo on Saturday to “help the Libyan people regain their stolen freedoms.”

Mar 10, 2011

Libyan exiles see the birth of a new nation

LONDON, March 10 (Reuters) – Libya’s tumultuous revolt has
filled exiles with pride that a new country is being born and
hope that it can emerge with a new image no longer tarnished by
association with the cruel policies of Muammar Gaddafi.

While the uprising has yet to succeed and the shape of a new
Libya lies in the future, Libyan intellectuals forced into exile
talk not only of freedom but of their personal ordeals and the
restoration of their country’s reputation.

Mar 3, 2011

Analysis: No quiet or quick exit seen for Gaddafi

LONDON (Reuters) – Anyone who thought that Libyan leader Muammar Gaddafi would go quietly like his fellow dictators in Tunisia and Egypt may have to think again.

He has never shied from spilling blood, and his end may well prove a bloody affair.

Mar 3, 2011

No quiet or quick exit seen for Gaddafi

LONDON (Reuters) – Anyone who thought that Libyan leader Muammar Gaddafi would go quietly like his fellow dictators in Tunisia and Egypt may have to think again.

He has never shied from spilling blood, and his end may well prove a bloody affair.

Feb 13, 2011

Unlike Iraq, Egyptians do regime change their way

CAIRO (Reuters) – The last Arab despot I saw overthrown was Saddam Hussein. That was all very different from the fall of Hosni Mubarak, toppled this week by his own people, not the might of a foreign army.

In 2003, I spent 18 days under fire in Baghdad as waves of cruise missiles vaporised swathes of the city. It was pounded day after day by American B-52s and British Tornados, before U.S. tanks rolled in to a prostrate capital and declared Iraq liberated from a brutal dictator.

Feb 12, 2011

Witness: Unlike Iraq, Egyptians do regime change their way

CAIRO (Reuters) – The last Arab despot I saw overthrown was Saddam Hussein. That was all very different from the fall of Hosni Mubarak, toppled this week by his own people, not the might of a foreign army.

In 2003, I spent 18 days under fire in Baghdad as waves of cruise missiles vaporized swathes of the city. It was pounded day after day by American B-52s and British Tornados, before U.S. tanks rolled in to a prostrate capital and declared Iraq liberated from a brutal dictator.

Feb 12, 2011

Jubilant Egyptians pray as post-Mubarak era dawns

CAIRO, Feb 12 (Reuters) – Egyptians woke to a new dawn on
Saturday after 30 years of autocratic rule under Hosni Mubarak,
full of hope after achieving almost unthinkable change, with the
army in charge and an uncertain future ahead.

As the muezzin’s call to prayer reverberated across Cairo,
the sound of horns honking in jubilation grew louder after a
night when millions across the Arab world’s most populous nation
joyfully celebrated the fall of the president.

Feb 12, 2011

After Mubarak, Egypt looks forward, region stirs

CAIRO (Reuters) – Egyptians in their millions danced and partied through the night on Saturday, celebrating the fall of the man who ruled like a pharaoh for 30 years and hoping their army will grant them democracy now Hosni Mubarak is gone.

With intoxicating speed a wave of people power has roared across the biggest Arab nation, just four weeks after Tunisians toppled their own ageing strongman. Now, across the Middle East, autocratic rulers are calculating their own chances of survival.

Feb 12, 2011

After Mubarak, Egypt looks forward

CAIRO (Reuters) – Egyptians in their millions danced and partied through the night on Saturday, celebrating the fall of the man who ruled like a pharaoh for 30 years and hoping their army will grant them democracy now Hosni Mubarak is gone.

With intoxicating speed a wave of people power has roared across the biggest Arab nation, just four weeks after Tunisians toppled their own aging strongman. Now, across the Middle East, autocratic rulers are calculating their own chances of survival.