Samia's Feed
Feb 10, 2011

Analysis: Egypt uprising hits Mubarak’s business elite

CAIRO (Reuters) – Egypt’s uprising has alarmed business executives who fear they will be made scapegoats to appease protesters who want to bring down President Hosni Mubarak and the moneyed elite around him.

The upheaval that has gripped Egypt since January 25 has targeted links between Mubarak’s government and a privileged class of loyalist business executives who have grown rich under privatization and other economic reforms.

Feb 10, 2011

Egypt uprising hits Mubarak’s business elite

CAIRO (Reuters) – Egypt’s uprising has alarmed business executives who fear they will be made scapegoats to appease protesters who want to bring down President Hosni Mubarak and the moneyed elite around him.

The upheaval that has gripped Egypt since Jan. 25 has targeted links between Mubarak’s government and a privileged class of loyalist business executives who have grown rich under privatisation and other economic reforms.

Feb 8, 2011

No work means no food for many Egyptians

CAIRO (Reuters) – Mustafa Fikri could not even be at his wife’s hospital bedside when she gave birth to their first son. He was working and the last thing on the Cairo cab driver’s mind was protesting against Hosni Mubarak’s repressive rule.

His preoccupation for the day was for the city’s roads to stay open and protests to be peaceful, so people would venture out and need his services. If he doesn’t hit the Cairo streets with his taxi, there won’t be food on the family table.

Feb 8, 2011

Corrected – Tide turns in favour of Egypt’s Brotherhood

CAIRO (Reuters) – The first time Essam el-Erian, went to jail, he was 27. Last Sunday, he left prison for the eighth time at the age of 57.

The medical doctor’s crime for each incarceration was belonging to the Muslim Botherhood, Egypt’s most influential and best-organised Islamist opposition movement and long feared by President Hosni Mubarak, Israel and the United States.

Feb 7, 2011

Egypt’s Mubarak survives immediate storm

CAIRO (Reuters) – President Hosni Mubarak may just have weathered the storm — at least for now. He has managed to maintain a commanding presence in Egypt’s unfolding drama even as thousands of protesters throng the streets demanding he go.

The embattled 82-year-old president has addressed the nation twice, chaired two cabinet meetings and appeared incessantly in state TV footage, repeated over and over again to present the image of a president in control, chatting and smiling.

Feb 7, 2011

Hosni Mubarak survives immediate storm

CAIRO (Reuters) – President Hosni Mubarak may just have weathered the storm — at least for now. He has managed to maintain a commanding presence in Egypt’s unfolding drama even as thousands of protesters throng the streets demanding he go.

The embattled 82-year-old president has addressed the nation twice, chaired two cabinet meetings and appeared incessantly in state TV footage, repeated over and over again to present the image of a president in control, chatting and smiling.

Feb 7, 2011

Analysis – Egypt’s Mubarak survives immediate storm

CAIRO (Reuters) – President Hosni Mubarak may just have weathered the storm — at least for now. He has managed to maintain a commanding presence in Egypt’s unfolding drama even as thousands of protesters throng the streets demanding he go.

The embattled 82-year-old president has addressed the nation twice, chaired two cabinet meetings and appeared incessantly in state TV footage, repeated over and over again to present the image of a president in control, chatting and smiling.

Feb 7, 2011

Q&A: Who’s taking the lead in Egypt’s crisis?

CAIRO (Reuters) – Protesters who have paralyzed Egypt and pushed the government into making concessions unimaginable two weeks ago, are still far from achieving their core demand that President Hosni Mubarak end his 30-year rule now.

Instead, the government seems to have regained the upper hand, at least for now, in controlling the pace of change and drawing the opposition under its umbrella for discussions.

Feb 7, 2011
via FaithWorld

Tide turns in favour of Egypt’s Brotherhood in revolt

Photo

(Essam El-Erian, spokesperson for the Muslim Brotherhood, at a news conference in Cairo February 6, 2011/Mohamed Abd El-Ghany)

The first time Essam el-Erian went to jail, he was 27. Last Sunday, he left prison for the eighth time at the age of 57. The medical doctor’s crime for each incarceration was belonging to the Muslim Botherhood, Egypt’s most influential and best-organised Islamist opposition movement and long feared by President Hosni Mubarak, Israel and the United States.

Feb 7, 2011

Feature – Tide turns in favour of Egypt’s Brotherhood

CAIRO (Reuters) – The first time Essam el-Erian, went to jail, he was 27. Last Sunday, he left prison for the eighth time at the age of 57.

The medical doctor’s crime for each incarceration was belonging to the Muslim Brotherhood, Egypt’s most influential and best-organised Islamist opposition movement and long feared by President Hosni Mubarak, Israel and the United States.