Samia's Feed
Aug 18, 2013
via FaithWorld

Egypt seen as graveyard of Arab Spring and Islamist ambitions for power

Photo

(Members of the Muslim Brotherhood and supporters of ousted Egyptian President Mohamed Mursi flee from shooting in front of Azbkya police station during clashes at Ramses Square in Cairo August 16, 2013. REUTERS/Amr Abdallah Dalsh)

As the army ruthlessly crushes the Muslim Brotherhood on the streets of Cairo, having swept away its elected president, Egypt is being painted as the graveyard of the Arab Spring and of Islamist hopes of shaping the region’s future.

Aug 18, 2013

Insight: Egypt seen as graveyard of Islamist ambitions for power

BEIRUT (Reuters) – As the army ruthlessly crushes the Muslim Brotherhood on the streets of Cairo, having swept away its elected president, Egypt is being painted as the graveyard of the Arab Spring and of Islamist hopes of shaping the region’s future.

This week’s bloody drama has sent shockwaves out of Egypt, the political weathervane and cultural heart of the Arab world. The effect on the region of the army’s power grab will not be uniform, because while countries such as Egypt are locked in a battle over identity, other states, from Syria to Yemen, and Libya to Iraq, are in an existential struggle for survival.

Aug 18, 2013

Egypt seen as graveyard of Islamist ambitions for power

BEIRUT, Aug 18 (Reuters) – As the army ruthlessly crushes
the Muslim Brotherhood on the streets of Cairo, having swept
away its elected president, Egypt is being painted as the
graveyard of the Arab Spring and of Islamist hopes of shaping
the region’s future.

This week’s bloody drama has sent shockwaves out of Egypt,
the political weathervane and cultural heart of the Arab world.
The effect on the region of the army’s power grab will not be
uniform, because while countries such as Egypt are locked in a
battle over identity, other states, from Syria to Yemen, and
Libya to Iraq, are in an existential struggle for survival.

Jul 10, 2013

Insight: Events in Egypt may influence, won’t define Syria war

BEIRUT (Reuters) – The fall of the Muslim Brotherhood in Egypt has put a new spring in the step of Bashar al-Assad, who sees it as a sign that Islamists – including those spearheading the Sunni-dominated rebellion against him – are in decline.

Exuding confidence after a recent successful army counter-offensive, and speaking as the Egyptian army was deposing Islamist president Mohamed Mursi, Assad said “what is happening in Egypt is the fall of what is known as political Islam.”

Jul 10, 2013

Events in Egypt may influence, won’t define Syria war

BEIRUT, July 10 (Reuters) – The fall of the Muslim
Brotherhood in Egypt has put a new spring in the step of Bashar
al-Assad, who sees it as a sign that Islamists – including those
spearheading the Sunni-dominated rebellion against him – are in
decline.

Exuding confidence after a recent successful army
counter-offensive, and speaking as the Egyptian army was
deposing Islamist president Mohamed Mursi, Assad said “what is
happening in Egypt is the fall of what is known as political
Islam.”

Jul 4, 2013

Insight – Downfall of Egypt’s Brotherhood game-changer in Middle East

BEIRUT (Reuters) – “Where Egypt goes, the region follows” is an adage often quoted by academics teaching the arcane politics of the Middle East.

Wednesday’s military takeover in Cairo, toppling Islamists who had so recently swept to power in one of many Arab upheavals, looks set to have a profound impact beyond Egypt’s borders.

Jul 4, 2013

Downfall of Egypt’s Brotherhood game-changer in Middle East

BEIRUT (Reuters) – “Where Egypt goes, the region follows” is an adage often quoted by academics teaching the arcane politics of the Middle East.

Wednesday’s military takeover in Cairo, toppling Islamists who had so recently swept to power in one of many Arab upheavals, looks set to have a profound impact beyond Egypt’s borders.

Jul 2, 2013
via FaithWorld

My return to Baghdad, the epicentre of Islam’s growing divide

Photo

(Samia Nakhoul, now Reuters Middle East Editor, is seen in the back of a car after being wounded at the Palestine Hotel in Baghdad, April 8, 2003, in this image taken from video footage. A U.S. tank fired a shell at the hotel from which she was reporting. Picture taken April 8, 2003. REUTERS/Pool via Reuters TV )

The last time I left Baghdad I was on a stretcher.

It was April 11, 2003, four days after U.S. troops pushed into the Iraqi capital at the end of a lightning campaign to overthrow Saddam Hussein. American forces had pounded Baghdad for weeks and as U.S. tanks raced into the city, I became a casualty alongside scores of Iraqis.

Jul 2, 2013

Return to Baghdad, epicentre of Islam’s growing divide

BAGHDAD (Reuters) – The last time I left Baghdad I was on a stretcher.

It was April 11, 2003, four days after U.S. troops pushed into the Iraqi capital at the end of a lightning campaign to overthrow Saddam Hussein. American forces had pounded Baghdad for weeks and as U.S. tanks raced into the city, I became a casualty alongside scores of Iraqis.

On the day Baghdad fell, I was waiting for an Iraqi surgeon to operate on me to remove shrapnel and bone fragments from my brain. He saved my life.

Jul 2, 2013

Special Report: Return to Baghdad, epicenter of Islam’s growing divide

BAGHDAD (Reuters) – The last time I left Baghdad I was on a stretcher.

It was April 11, 2003, four days after U.S. troops pushed into the Iraqi capital at the end of a lightning campaign to overthrow Saddam Hussein. American forces had pounded Baghdad for weeks and as U.S. tanks raced into the city, I became a casualty alongside scores of Iraqis.

On the day Baghdad fell, I was waiting for an Iraqi surgeon to operate on me to remove shrapnel and bone fragments from my brain. He saved my life.