Sanjeev's Feed
May 18, 2011
via Afghan Journal

Pakistan : four probes and a killing

Photo

Pakistan has launched four separate investigations into the life and death of Osama bin Laden on its soil, according to U.S. Senator John Kerry. The army, the air force and the intelligence establishment are running a probe each while parliament last week ordered an investigation by an independent commission to be set up for the purpose.

It’s not entirely clear who is investigating what but a common theme running through the probes is to find out how did the United States launch a heliborne  operation so deep in the country, hunt bin Laden down in his compound after a shootout in the outer wing  and fly away with his corpse, without the knowledge of the Pakistani authorities. Indeed the military and the government only got to know about it after the Americans told them once they were safely out of Pakistani airspace.

May 15, 2011

Pakistan builds low yield nuclear capability,concern grows

SINGAPORE (Reuters) – Pakistan’s successful test of a missile able to carry short range nuclear weapons threatens to raise tensions in a region already nervous that the death of Osama bin Laden will create more instability.

Tactical nuclear weapons, as these are called, are often seen as more dangerous than the traditional strategic weapons because their small size and vulnerability to misuse. Theft makes them a risk to global security.

May 15, 2011

Analysis: Pakistan builds low yield nuclear capability

SINGAPORE (Reuters) – Pakistan’s successful test of a missile able to carry short range nuclear weapons threatens to raise tensions in a region already nervous that the death of Osama bin Laden will create more instability.

Tactical nuclear weapons, as these are called, are often seen as more dangerous than the traditional strategic weapons because their small size and vulnerability to misuse. Theft makes them a risk to global security.

May 15, 2011
via Afghan Journal

Pakistan’s nuclear weapons and the bin Laden raid

Photo

In conducting a raid deep inside Pakistan to take out Osama bin Laden, the United States pushed the boundaries of military operations,  inter-state ties and international law, all of which are the subject of a raging debate in the region and beyond. 

 One of the less talked-about issues is that the boots-on-ground operation by the U.S. Special Forces also blows a hole in a long-held argument that states which have nuclear weapons, legitimately or otherwise,  face a lower chance of a foreign strike or invasion than those without them. Thus  the United States didn’t think twice before going into Afghanistan within weeks of the September 11 attacks or striking against Libya now because there was no nuclear threat lurking at the back of the mind. Even Iraq was a tempting target because it was not known to have a well-established nuclear arsenal  although the whole point of the invasion was that it had weapons of mass destruction. That only turned out to be untrue.

May 5, 2011
via FaithWorld

Even without bin Laden, Pakistan’s Islamist militants strike fear

Photo

(Supporters of al-Qaeda leader Osama bin Laden shout anti-American slogans, after the news of his death, during a rally in Quetta May 2, 2011/Naseer Ahmed)

The death of Osama bin Laden has robbed Islamist militants of their biggest inspiration and al Qaeda itself has dwindled to a few hundred fighters in the region, but Pakistan remains a haven for militants with both ambition and means to strike overseas. Worse, there are signs that groups such as the Lashkar-e-Taiba (Army of the Pure), nurtured by Pakistan’s spy agency to advance strategic interests in India and Afghanistan, are no longer entirely under the agency’s control.

May 5, 2011

Analysis: Even without bin Laden, Pakistan militants strike fear

SINGAPORE (Reuters) – The death of Osama bin Laden has robbed Islamist militants of their biggest inspiration and al Qaeda itself has dwindled to a few hundred fighters in the region, but Pakistan remains a haven for militants with both ambition and means to strike overseas.

Worse, there are signs that groups such as the Lashkar-e-Taiba (Army of the Pure), nurtured by Pakistan’s spy agency to advance strategic interests in India and Afghanistan, are no longer entirely under the agency’s control.

May 5, 2011

Even without bin Laden, Pakistan militants strike fear

SINGAPORE, May 5 (Reuters) – The death of Osama bin Laden
has robbed Islamist militants of their biggest inspiration and
al Qaeda itself has dwindled to a few hundred fighters in the
region, but Pakistan remains a haven for militants with both
ambition and means to strike overseas.

Worse, there are signs that groups such as the
Lashkar-e-Taiba (Army of the Pure), nurtured by Pakistan’s spy
agency to advance strategic interests in India and Afghanistan,
are no longer entirely under the agency’s control.

Apr 28, 2011
via Afghan Journal

Pakistan and Afghanistan: strategic allies or sworn enemies?

Photo

The armies of Afghanistan and Pakistan exchanged artillery firing across their border this week in which the Pakistan military said it had lost a soldier while several others including civilians were wounded. Newspaper reports in Pakistan speak of at least three Afghan soldiers killed in the clash near Angoor Adda in Pakistan’s South Waziristan region.

It isn’t new, there was a clash last week when an Afghan militia attacked a Pakistan border post in the Lower Dir district, according to the Pakistani media, in which 14 security personnel were killed besides a large number of the Afghan militiamen. 

Apr 24, 2011
via Afghan Journal

Behind volatile U.S.-Pakistan ties : the Afghan endgame ?

Photo

Pakistan’s anger over U.S. drone strikes in its northwest region is unabated and this weekend protesters sat on a highway blocking convoys carrying supplies for NATO troops in Afghanistan.

Disrupting supplies, including fuel trucks, can severely impair the huge war effort in Afghanistan and its the sort of escalatory action that will likely draw a swift response from the United States, one way or the other.

Apr 17, 2011
via Afghan Journal

US-Pakistan ties : bleeding America in Afghanistan

Photo

U.S.- Pakistan ties are entering an even  more dangerous phase, going  by the language that the two sides are employing ever since a public airing of  differences over covert U.S. activities in Pakistan 

It’s a game of smoke and mirrors and some of it could be bluff and bluster, but there is little doubt that Pakistan and America are  stuck in an unhappy relationship, attacking each other as much as  the militants  they joined forces against ten years ago.