Sanjeev's Feed
Mar 25, 2011

India, China’s rivalry and a tale of two ports

SINGAPORE, March 25 (Reuters) – India and China’s quest for
clout and resources extends across the globe, but perhaps the
best manifestation of this fierce competition, and possible sign
of who will ultimately win, lies in a tale of two ports.

The port of Chabahar in the southwest corner of Iran, which
India is hoping will win it access to Central Asia and
Afghanistan, is barely 72km (44 mile) from Pakistan’s deep-water
Gwadar port which China has built to secure its energy supplies.

Mar 21, 2011
via Afghan Journal

United States begins a new war, what happens to Afghanistan?

Photo

The United States has said the scope of its military intervention in Libya is limited, but it nevertheless raises questions about what happens to the two other wars that it is waging, especially in Afghanistan. The last time Washington took the eye off the ball in Afghanistan was in 2003 when it launched the Iraq war and then got so bogged down there that a low level and sporadic Taliban resistance in southern Afghanistan grew into a full blown insurgency from which it is still trying to extricate itself.

The question then is will the U.S. attention again shift away from Afghanistan and to Libya  and indeed other African and Middle East countries where revolts  against decades of authoritarian rule are gaining ground, and unsettling every strategic calculation.   Already U.S. Republicans are saying they are concerned that U.S. forces may be getting drawn into a costly, long-running operation in Libya that lacks clear goals.  If it ends in a stalemate – a possibility recognized by Joint Chiefs of Staff Admiral Mike Mullen – how focused can America be on Afghanistan where you can argue that the stakes are arguably less now that al Qaeda has largely been pushed out, and the fight is almost entirely with the Taliban.

Mar 8, 2011

BJP on the move as Congress-led coalition flounders

NEW DELHI (Reuters) – A year ago, India’s main opposition Bharatiya Janata Party (BJP) was tearing itself apart after a second successive general election defeat, its dream of leading India’s rise to the global centre stage in tatters.

But with Prime Minister Manmohan Singh’s Congress-led coalition engulfed by corruption scandals and feuding with its allies, the Hindu nationalists see a reversal of fortunes.

Mar 7, 2011

DMK puts off decision to quit, holds talks

NEW DELHI (Reuters) – The Dravida Munnetra Kazhagam (DMK) put off its plan to resign ministerial posts until Tuesday, offering respite to the Congress-led government fighting to win back public trust after a raft of corruption scandals.

The DMK, which gives Prime Minister Manmohan Singh’s coalition vital support in parliament, had said its six ministers would quit the coalition on Monday because of a row over seat to be contested in a local election next month.

Mar 7, 2011

India ally puts off decision to quit, holds talks

NEW DELHI, March 7 (Reuters) – A key member of India’s
Congress-led coalition put off its plan to resign ministerial
posts until Tuesday, offering respite to a government fighting
to win back public trust after a raft of corruption scandals.

The Dravida Munnetra Kazhagam, which gives Prime Minister
Manmohan Singh’s coalition vital support in parliament, had said
its six ministers would quit the coalition on Monday because of
a row over seat to be contested in a local election next month.

Mar 7, 2011

India ally to quit cabinet, coalition safe for now

NEW DELHI (Reuters) – Leaders of a key party in India’s ruling coalition travelled to Delhi Monday to formally quit the government, a move that will force a weakened prime minister to find alternative alliances to stay in power.

The move by the DMK party, announced over the weekend, comes at a time when Manmohan Singh is battling rising anger over a raft of corruption scandals and persistently high food inflation.

Mar 7, 2011

DMK to quit cabinet, coalition safe for now

NEW DELHI (Reuters) – Leaders of the DMK, a key party in India’s ruling coalition, travelled to Delhi on Monday to formally quit the government, a move that will force a weakened prime minister to find alternative alliances to stay in power.

The move by the DMK party, announced over the weekend, comes at a time when Manmohan Singh is battling rising anger over a raft of corruption scandals and persistently high food inflation.

Mar 6, 2011

India Congress aims to shore up government after ally quits

NEW DELHI (Reuters) – India’s Congress party moved to shore up its ruling coalition on Sunday after a key partner said its ministers will formally quit the cabinet on Monday, the latest setback for a government beset by corruption scandals.

Prime Minister Manmohan Singh’s government is not in immediate threat of collapse because the Dravida Munnetra Kazagham (DMK) party has said it will continue to offer conditional support even after its six ministers leave because of a row over local elections.

Mar 6, 2011

India Congress aims to shore up govt after ally quits

NEW DELHI, March 6 (Reuters) – India’s Congress party moved
to shore up its ruling coalition on Sunday after a key partner
said its ministers will formally quit the cabinet on Monday, the
latest setback for a government beset by corruption scandals.

Prime Minister Manmohan Singh’s government is not in
immediate threat of collapse because the Dravida Munnetra
Kazagham (DMK) party has said it will continue to offer
conditional support even after its six ministers leave because
of a row over local elections.

Mar 6, 2011

Congress tries to woo back ally, shore up coalition

NEW DELHI (Reuters) – Prime Minister Manmohan Singh on Sunday tried to patch things up with a key ally that said it would quit his cabinet, aiming to avert another crisis for a government shaken by a raft of corruption scandals.

The Dravida Munnetra Kazhagham (DMK) party, which gave the Congress party-led coalition a slim majority in parliament, said on Saturday it was pulling out its ministers because of a dispute over seats to be contested in state assembly elections next month.