Sarah's Feed
Jan 20, 2012
via MediaFile

Stop SOPA banners might morph in future protests

Getting people to add “STOP SOPA” banners to their Twitter and Facebook profile photos was more than just a message about pending legislation.

The banners, which swept the Internet in recent days, allowed people to quickly signal opposition to the antipiracy bills known as PIPA and SOPA, which many critics say are too broad. They are the brainchild of Greg Hochmuth, an engineer at photo site Instagram, and former Google product manager Hunter Walk, who created the site blackoutsopa.org.

Jan 19, 2012

US lawmakers flip on piracy bills protested on Web

Jan 18 (Reuters) – Wikipedia, the world’s free online
encyclopedia, went dark on Wednesday and other Internet players
including Google put black censorship bars on portions of their
websites in protest of pending U.S. legislation designed to curb
online piracy.

The unusual protest was visible across the Internet in many
forms on Wednesday, with dozens of commercial and non-profit
websites either closing down for the day or urging visitors to
oppose what had until recently been a relatively obscure and
technical legislative proposal.

Jan 18, 2012

Key facts about U.S. online piracy bills SOPA and PIPA

By Malathi Nayak and Sarah McBride

(Reuters) – The House of Representative’s Stop Online Piracy Act and the Senate’s Preventing Real Online Threats to Economic Creativity and Theft of Intellectual Property Act have generated fierce opposition within the technology community. Here are some facts about the bills:

What would SOPA and PIPA do?

** The legislation, known as SOPA in the U.S. House of Representatives and PIPA in the Senate, would use court orders to curb access to foreign websites “dedicated to theft” through techniques such as disabling links to those sites.

Jan 18, 2012

Pockets of Internet go dark to protest piracy bills

Jan 18 (Reuters) – Wikipedia, the world’s free online
encyclopedia, went dark on Wednesday and other Internet players
including Google put black censorship bars on portions of their
websites in protest of pending U.S. legislation designed to curb
online piracy.

The unusual protest was visible across the Internet in many
forms on Wednesday, with dozens of commercial and non-profit
websites either closing down for the day or urging visitors to
oppose what had until recently been a relatively obscure and
technical legislative proposal.

Jan 18, 2012

Wikipedia dark, Google lobbies in protest of proposed anti-piracy law

SAN FRANCISCO, Jan 18 (Reuters) – The English page of
Wikipedia, the world’s free online encyclopedia, was dark on
Wednesday except for a paragraph urging users to protest
legislation designed to stop copyright piracy, but that
Wikipedia says “could fatally damage the free and open
Internet.”

Google’s home search page has the logo: “Tell Congress:
Please don’t censor the web!”

Jan 18, 2012

Internet blackout against U.S. law fails to enlist big sites

SAN FRANCISCO (Reuters) – A blackout scheduled for Wednesday to protest against proposed legislation on online piracy has failed to get the support of the biggest Internet players.

Despite calls for the participation of sites such as Facebook, Twitter and other big names, the biggest participants are the online dictionary Wikipedia and the social-news website Reddit.

Jan 16, 2012

U.S. online piracy bill headed for major makeover

By Sarah McBride

(Reuters) – U.S. legislation aimed at curbing online piracy, which had appeared to be on a fast track for approval by Congress, appears likely to be scaled back or jettisoned entirely in the wake of critical comments over the weekend from the White House, people familiar with the matter said.

The legislation, known as SOPA in the House of Representatives and PIPA in the Senate, has been a major priority for entertainment companies, publishers, pharmaceutical firms and many industry groups, who say it is critical to curbing online piracy that costs them billions of dollars a year.

Jan 6, 2012
via MediaFile

Social-studying site Piazza snags funding

Photo

Piazza, a Facebook-alumna created site that is trying to bring a little social-networking pizazz to university education, has secured $6 million in funding from Bessemer Venture Partners, Kapor Capital, and Felicis Ventures.

The Palo Alto, Calif.-based site, launched last year, is helping university students collaborate in online study groups under the guidance of their instructors. The cash will help Piazza expand beyond the several hundred schools where students use it today, said founder and chief executive Pooja Sankar, and into new study areas. Currently, it has the most traction in science, technology, engineering and math.

Dec 21, 2011
via MediaFile

Tesla close to selling out of Model S Signature Edition

Photo

Tesla hasn’t even made them available to customers yet, but the electric carmaker is almost out of the most elite version of its already-elite sedan– the Model S Signature Edition.

A spokesman says that the company is “pretty close to selling out” on the Signature Edition, on which it has said it will only take 1,000 orders. The company declined to say how close it was to that limit, but the spokesman said he expected that the release of its pricing and options packages yesterday would spur more customers to choose the Signature.

Dec 21, 2011

Analysis: Relaxed U.S. securities laws could boost SecondMarket

SAN FRANCISCO (Reuters) – Kevin Ryan, chief executive of online retailer Gilt Groupe, is keeping close tabs on congressional legislation that might enable him to have more shareholders in his young company.

Barry Silbert, chief executive of SecondMarket, an exchange for trading of private-company shares, is keeping close tabs on Ryan.