Shane's Feed
Apr 25, 2014
via Counterparties

Post Felix

Today is Felix’s last day at Reuters. Here’s the link to his mega-million word blog archive (start from the beginning, in March 2009, if you like). Because we’re source-agnostic, you can also find some of his best stuff from the Reuters era at Wired, Slate, the Atlantic, News Genius, CJR, the NYT, and NY Mag. There’s also Felix TV, his personal site, his Tumblr, his Medium archive, and, of course, the Twitter feed we all aspire to.

Counterparties may have been the brainchild of Felix and the recently departed Ryan McCarthy, but the blog, site, newsletter, and Twitter feed will continue to exist in their absence. It will be run by Ben Walsh and Shane Ferro, with some non-trivial amount of snark.

Apr 24, 2014
via Counterparties

Less than neutral

As foreshadowed by the January Verizon v FCC case, net neutrality looks as though it’s officially dead. For the third time, the Federal Communications Commission is attempting to regulate the speed of the internet. This time, while it proposes preventing internet service providers from blocking internet content, it is likely to allow the creation of “fast lanes” — where big corporations like Netflix or YouTube can pay for their video to be streamed faster than content from other companies.  The commission will vote on the measure at its May 15 meeting.

On the official FCC blog, chairman Tom Wheeler, who was a lobbyist for the cable industry before being appointed to the FCC, tries to calm the concerns about the new regulation, saying that behavior “limiting the openness of the internet will not be permitted”. His post focuses on the idea that, within the parameters of the Verizon case, the FCC is allowed to stop “harmful conduct” if it isn’t “commercially reasonable”. In other words, “internet providers would be required to offer a baseline level of service”, writes Amy Schatz. Above that base level of service, allowing companies to pay to deliver certain content faster to consumers seems to be okay.

Apr 24, 2014
via Counterparties

Less than neutral

As foreshadowed by the January Verizon v FCC case, net neutrality looks as though it’s officially dead. For the third time, the Federal Communications Commission is attempting to regulate the speed of the internet. This time, while it proposes preventing internet service providers from blocking internet content, it is likely to allow the creation of “fast lanes” — where big corporations like Netflix or YouTube can pay for their video to be streamed faster than content from other companies.  The commission will vote on the measure at its May 15 meeting.

On the official FCC blog, chairman Tom Wheeler, who was a lobbyist for the cable industry before being appointed to the FCC, tries to calm the concerns about the new regulation, saying that behavior “limiting the openness of the internet will not be permitted”. His post focuses on the idea that, within the parameters of the Verizon case, the FCC is allowed to stop “harmful conduct” if it isn’t “commercially reasonable”. In other words, “internet providers would be required to offer a baseline level of service”, writes Amy Schatz. Above that base level of service, allowing companies to pay to deliver certain content faster to consumers seems to be okay.

Apr 23, 2014
via Counterparties

A new wrinkle in activism

Hedge fund managers are getting back in the innovation game — or at least Bill Ackman is. Yesterday, Ackman announced that he and Valeant Pharmaceuticals were making a $50 billion hostile bid for Allergan, the maker of Botox. Ackman also announced that his hedge fund owns a 9.7% stake in Allergan. Allergan quickly did what the targets of hostile takeovers do and adopted a poison pill to keep any unapproved investor from owning more than 10% of its shares.

Steven Davidoff says the bid shows that activist investors are becoming “a ready arsenal of capital that can be used to aid hostile takeovers by corporations”. Valeant itself, Breakingviews’ Robert Cyran and Richard Beales say, “is essentially the creation of an activist hedge fund, ValueAct Capital, which set it on the path of serial deal-making”.

Apr 23, 2014
via Counterparties

A new wrinkle in activism

Hedge fund managers are getting back in the innovation game — or at least Bill Ackman is. Yesterday, Ackman announced that he and Valeant Pharmaceuticals were making a $50 billion hostile bid for Allergan, the maker of Botox. Ackman also announced that his hedge fund owns a 9.7% stake in Allergan. Allergan quickly did what the targets of hostile takeovers do and adopted a poison pill to keep any unapproved investor from owning more than 10% of its shares.

Steven Davidoff says the bid shows that activist investors are becoming “a ready arsenal of capital that can be used to aid hostile takeovers by corporations”. Valeant itself, Breakingviews’ Robert Cyran and Richard Beales say, “is essentially the creation of an activist hedge fund, ValueAct Capital, which set it on the path of serial deal-making”.

Apr 23, 2014
via Counterparties

A new wrinkle in activism

Hedge fund managers are getting back in the innovation game — or at least Bill Ackman is. Yesterday, Ackman announced that he and Valeant Pharmaceuticals were making a $50 billion hostile bid for Allergan, the maker of Botox. Ackman also announced that his hedge fund owns a 9.7% stake in Allergan. Allergan quickly did what the targets of hostile takeovers do and adopted a poison pill to keep any unapproved investor from owning more than 10% of its shares.

Steven Davidoff says the bid shows that activist investors are becoming “a ready arsenal of capital that can be used to aid hostile takeovers by corporations”. Valeant itself, Breakingviews’ Robert Cyran and Richard Beales say, “is essentially the creation of an activist hedge fund, ValueAct Capital, which set it on the path of serial deal-making”.

Apr 23, 2014
via Counterparties

A new wrinkle in activism

Hedge fund managers are getting back in the innovation game — or at least Bill Ackman is. Yesterday, Ackman announced that he and Valeant Pharmaceuticals were making a $50 billion hostile bid for Allergan, the maker of Botox. Ackman also announced that his hedge fund owns a 9.7% stake in Allergan. Allergan quickly did what the targets of hostile takeovers do and adopted a poison pill to keep any unapproved investor from owning more than 10% of its shares.

Steven Davidoff says the bid shows that activist investors are becoming “a ready arsenal of capital that can be used to aid hostile takeovers by corporations”. Valeant itself, Breakingviews’ Robert Cyran and Richard Beales say, “is essentially the creation of an activist hedge fund, ValueAct Capital, which set it on the path of serial deal-making”.

Apr 23, 2014
via Counterparties

A new wrinkle in activism

Hedge fund managers are getting back in the innovation game — or at least Bill Ackman is. Yesterday, Ackman announced that he and Valeant Pharmaceuticals were making a $50 billion hostile bid for Allergan, the maker of Botox. Ackman also announced that his hedge fund owns a 9.7% stake in Allergan. Allergan quickly did what the targets of hostile takeovers do and adopted a poison pill to keep any unapproved investor from owning more than 10% of its shares.

Steven Davidoff says the bid shows that activist investors are becoming “a ready arsenal of capital that can be used to aid hostile takeovers by corporations”. Valeant itself, Breakingviews’ Robert Cyran and Richard Beales say, “is essentially the creation of an activist hedge fund, ValueAct Capital, which set it on the path of serial deal-making”.

Apr 23, 2014
via Counterparties

A new wrinkle in activism

Hedge fund managers are getting back in the innovation game — or at least Bill Ackman is. Yesterday, Ackman announced that he and Valeant Pharmaceuticals were making a $50 billion hostile bid for Allergan, the maker of Botox. Ackman also announced that his hedge fund owns a 9.7% stake in Allergan. Allergan quickly did what the targets of hostile takeovers do and adopted a poison pill to keep any unapproved investor from owning more than 10% of its shares.

Steven Davidoff says the bid shows that activist investors are becoming “a ready arsenal of capital that can be used to aid hostile takeovers by corporations”. Valeant itself, Breakingviews’ Robert Cyran and Richard Beales say, “is essentially the creation of an activist hedge fund, ValueAct Capital, which set it on the path of serial deal-making”.

Apr 23, 2014
via Counterparties

A new wrinkle in activism

Hedge fund managers are getting back in the innovation game — or at least Bill Ackman is. Yesterday, Ackman announced that he and Valeant Pharmaceuticals were making a $50 billion hostile bid for Allergan, the maker of Botox. Ackman also announced that his hedge fund owns a 9.7% stake in Allergan. Allergan quickly did what the targets of hostile takeovers do and adopted a poison pill to keep any unapproved investor from owning more than 10% of its shares.

Steven Davidoff says the bid shows that activist investors are becoming “a ready arsenal of capital that can be used to aid hostile takeovers by corporations”. Valeant itself, Breakingviews’ Robert Cyran and Richard Beales say, “is essentially the creation of an activist hedge fund, ValueAct Capital, which set it on the path of serial deal-making”.