Senior U.S. Health & Science Correspondent, 3 Times Square
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Feb 25, 2015

FDA seeks to speed updates to “superbug” device labels

WASHINGTON/NEW YORK (Reuters) – The U.S. Food and Drug
Administration is working to speed label changes for medical
devices linked to a “superbug” outbreak in California, possibly
to include new warnings and more stringent cleaning and
disinfecting instructions, a senior official said.

Last week the FDA warned that the complex design of the
reusable duodenoscopes, which are threaded through the mouth,
throat and stomach and used in a variety of gastrointestinal
procedures, makes them difficult to disinfect properly, even
when instructions provided by the manufacturers are followed.
Pentax Medical, Fujifilm Holdings Corp and Olympus Corp
are the leading makers of these endoscopes.

Feb 25, 2015

Exclusive: FDA seeks to speed updates to ‘superbug’ device labels

WASHINGTON/NEW YORK (Reuters) – The U.S. Food and Drug Administration is working to speed label changes for medical devices linked to a “superbug” outbreak in California, possibly to include new warnings and more stringent cleaning and disinfecting instructions, a senior official said.

Last week the FDA warned that the complex design of the reusable duodenoscopes, which are threaded through the mouth, throat and stomach and used in a variety of gastrointestinal procedures, makes them difficult to disinfect properly, even when instructions provided by the manufacturers are followed. Pentax Medical, Fujifilm Holdings Corp and Olympus Corp are the leading makers of these endoscopes.

Feb 21, 2015

Exclusive: U.S. health officials push for stricter ‘superbug’ defense

NEW YORK (Reuters) – The U.S. government is close to finalizing instructions to prevent medical devices responsible for transmitting “superbugs” from spreading the potentially fatal pathogens between patients, the scientist leading the effort said.

The new protocol for the reusable devices, called duodenoscopes, is being developed by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), whose disease detectives have investigated duodenoscope-transmitted infections since 2013.

Feb 20, 2015

U.S. FDA knew devices spread fatal ‘superbug’ but does not order fix

NEW YORK, Feb 19 (Reuters) – U.S. health regulators have
known since at least 2009 that the medical devices at the center
of the “superbug” outbreak at UCLA can transmit lethal
infections but have not recommended any new safety requirements,
a lapse that threatens patient safety, experts in
hospital-acquired infections said.

The latest outbreak involving the reusable devices called
duodenoscopes, which are inserted down the throat, may have
exposed 179 patients at UCLA’s Ronald Reagan Medical Center in
Los Angeles and contributed to two deaths.

Feb 18, 2015

Scientists unveil map of ‘epigenome,’ a second genetic code

NEW YORK (Reuters) – Scientists for the first time have mapped out the molecular “switches” that can turn on or silence individual genes in the DNA in more than 100 types of human cells, an accomplishment that reveals the complexity of genetic information and the challenges of interpreting it.

Researchers unveiled the map of the “epigenome” in the journal Nature on Wednesday, alongside nearly two dozen related papers. The mapping effort is being carried out under a 10-year, $240 million U.S. government research program, the Roadmap Epigenomics Program, which was launched in 2008.

Feb 18, 2015

Marijuana munchies are all in the brain, U.S. study finds

NEW YORK (Reuters) – If recent laws legalizing marijuana in more U.S. states also boost sales of potato chips and brownies, scientists will know why: A study in mice published on Wednesday found, unexpectedly, that the active ingredients in pot essentially make appetite-curbing regions of the brain reverse functions.

When that happens, neurons that ordinarily transmit a signal that means, “you’re full, stop eating,” instead give the brain the munchies, neurobiologists reported in the journal Nature.

Feb 12, 2015
Feb 12, 2015
Feb 12, 2015
Feb 12, 2015
    • About Sharon

      "After covering science and medicine at Newsweek, then the Wall Street Journal, then Newsweek again, I joined Reuters in 2012 to report on neuroscience, genetics, cognitive science, and other research. My books have focused on the brain: 2007's Train Your Mind, Change Your Brain (the first popular account of the revolution in neuroplasticity), and 2012's The Emotional Life of Your Brain (with Richard J. Davidson)."
      Joined Reuters:
      2012
      Languages:
      English
    • More from Sharon

      Publications:
      The Emotional Life of Your Brain (2012)
      Train Your Mind, Change Your Brain (2007)
      The Mind and the Brain (2002)
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