Shilpa's Feed
Aug 15, 2013
via India Masala

Once Upon Ay Time in Mumbai Dobaara: All talk, no action

Photo

(Any opinions expressed here are those of the author and not of Thomson Reuters)

Milan Luthria’s tongue-twister of a movie “Once Upon Ay Time in Mumbai Dobaara!” is a hark back to the gangster films of the 1980s, the ones with mafia dons, their tempestuous love lives and all the complications that came with it.

But director Luthria and writer Rajat Arora are apparently convinced that they’ve come up with something original and clever. Their smugness shows on screen and gets on your nerves. For a gangster film, “Mumbai Dobaara” has just about three action scenes and even in the most crucial action sequence, the characters are busy delivering long-drawn-out homilies on loyalty and friendship. That is what this film is, really – all talk and no action.

Aug 9, 2013
via India Masala

Chennai Express – Doesn’t reach its destination

Photo

To get a sense of Rohit Shetty’s “Chennai Express,” wait for the closing credits to roll.

The film contains all the stereotypes that exist about those who live south of the Vindhyas, but narrated by someone who doesn’t live there. A South Indian film for those not living in the South, so to speak.

Aug 8, 2013

Shoojit Sircar’s “Madras Cafe” recreates Sri Lanka war

MUMBAI (Reuters) – Filmmaker Shoojit Sircar wowed Bollywood moviegoers in 2012 with a light-hearted take on infertility and sperm donation. This year, he hopes to repeat the success of “Vicky Donor” with an espionage thriller set in Sri Lanka.

“Madras Cafe” stars John Abraham and Nargis Fakhri in a film that has attracted some controversy over its alleged portrayal of Tamil Tiger separatists during the civil war in Sri Lanka.

Aug 8, 2013
Aug 7, 2013

Imtiaz Ali and the art of last-minute filmmaking

MUMBAI (Reuters) – When Imtiaz Ali began filming his new movie “Highway”, the Bollywood filmmaker had little more than a one-line script for a story he came up with years before his industry debut as a director.

Ali, 42, shot the film sequentially and often improvised dialogue on set, relying on the ambience to decide what his characters would do in a particular scene.

Jul 26, 2013
via India Masala

Issaq: Doomed love story

Photo

What director Manish Tiwary was trying to achieve in “Issaq”, his version of Romeo and Juliet, only he can say. If you didn’t know you were watching a modern-day retelling of Shakespeare’s classic, you’d be forgiven for walking out halfway through the film.

The movie starts with a bizarre killing on a deserted bridge and then moves on to more bizarreness. “Issaq” is a disjointed effort, one that ceases to make any sense after the first few minutes.

Jul 26, 2013
via India Masala

Bajatey Raho: Much ado about nothing

Photo

Shashant Shah‘s “Bajatey Raho” is a comedy about a motley group of people who try to con a businessman out of the millions he made by cheating gullible clients.

Ravi Kishan plays evil businessman Sabharwal, who owns everything from schools to dairy farms and treats his staff like dirt.

Jul 25, 2013

Hollywood primed for film on Indian math genius Ramanujan

MUMBAI (Reuters) – A new Hollywood film starring Dev Patel as Srinivasa Ramanujan will put the spotlight on the Indian math genius best known for his work on the theory of prime numbers.

Ramanujan, who died in 1920, was considered one of the brightest minds in mathematics, despite his lack of a formal education.

Jul 19, 2013
via India Masala

Ship of Theseus: Looking for the right answers

Photo

During an interview about his 2012 film “Shanghai”, director Dibakar Banerjee spoke about the difficulty of asking existential questions and portraying them coherently on the big screen.

Anand Gandhi, director of “Ship of Theseus”, has the same problem but is able to execute it almost perfectly, a task most filmmakers would have found difficult.

Jul 18, 2013
via India Masala

D-Day: Gripping enough

Photo

(Any opinions expressed here are those of the author and not of Thomson Reuters)

The search for India’s most wanted criminal and a fictitious operation to capture him in Pakistan is a great idea for a Bollywood movie. Filmmaker Nikhil Advani uses this premise in “D-Day” and exploits it to maximum effect.

Advani builds a gripping tale that chronicles a covert operation to bring back Goldman, a fictional mafia don undoubtedly based on Dawood Ibrahim. He lives in Pakistan, masterminds terrorist attacks in India, is protected by the government of the country and speaks to his henchmen in Marathi (The real-life Dawood Ibrahim is from Ratnagiri district in Maharashtra).

    • About Shilpa

      "Shilpa covers Bollywood and entertainment for Reuters India since 2008. She has previously worked with DNA and the Press Trust of India, covering train blasts in Mumbai, a constitutional crisis in Goa and protests in New Delhi. On Twitter, she's @shilpajay."
    • More from Shilpa

    • Follow Shilpa