Shilpa's Feed
Jun 7, 2012

Emraan Hashmi’s star rises in Bollywood

MUMBAI (Reuters) – If you watched the crime thriller “Footpath” nearly a decade ago, and noticed the lean actor playing Raghu on screen, you would be forgiven for not recognising Bollywood’s rising star.

When he made his debut in 2003, Emraan Hashmi was hardly considered leading man material, and the film industry was happy to label him as part of the “Bhatt camp” — where he worked in films made by his uncles Mahesh and Mukesh Bhatt.

Jun 5, 2012
Jun 5, 2012
Jun 4, 2012

Corrected: Indian TV fights a bleeping battle with censors

MUMBAI (Reuters) – When Bollywood film-maker Kunal Deshmukh set out to make “Jannat 2″ (Heaven 2), a raunchy tale about arms dealing with plenty of swearing and bare skin, he ended up shooting two versions – one for cinema audiences, and the other for television.

Deshmukh was not being extravagant. Like many Indian movie producers and TV broadcasters, he walked a tightrope of catering to the tastes of a rapidly modernizing but largely conservative country, whose censors have scant tolerance for adult content.

Jun 1, 2012
via India Masala

Rowdy Rathore: South Indian remix

Photo

When Akshay Kumar fashions himself a sudarshan chakra (the ultimate weapon of destructive in Indian mythology) from a broken bamboo stick and some construction equipment and uses it to slay 20 men with axes and knives, you know “Rowdy Rathore” isn’t aiming for realistic cinema.

Once you reconcile yourself to that and realise that director Prabhu Deva is channeling his inner Rajnikanth, you can sit back and enjoy the Ray-Bans, nubile dancers and a pretty liberal use of cinematic liberties.

May 30, 2012

TV fights a bleeping battle with censors in India

MUMBAI (Reuters) – When Bollywood film-maker Kunal Deshmukh set out to make “Jannat 2″, a raunchy tale about arms dealing with plenty of swearing and bare skin, he ended up shooting two versions – one for cinema audiences, and the other for television.

Deshmukh was not being extravagant. Like many Indian movie producers and TV broadcasters, he walked a tightrope of catering to the tastes of a rapidly modernising but largely conservative country, whose censors have scant tolerance for adult content.

May 30, 2012

Indian TV fights a bleeping battle with censors

MUMBAI, May 30 (Reuters) – When Bollywood film-maker Kunal
Deshmukh set out to make “Jannat 2″ (Heaven 2), a raunchy tale
about arms dealing with plenty of swearing and bare skin, he
ended up shooting two versions – one for cinema audiences, and
the other for television.

Deshmukh was not being extravagant. Like many Indian movie
producers and TV broadcasters, he walked a tightrope of catering
to the tastes of a rapidly modernising but largely conservative
country, whose censors have scant tolerance for adult content.

May 24, 2012
via India Masala

Arjun – The Warrior Prince: Hit-and-miss

Photo

No other tale is as familiar to me as the Mahabharat. Whether it was stories heard in my childhood, animated books that were gifted, or watching B. R. Chopra’s television series over Sunday breakfast, this epic is ingrained in the psyche.

Which is why, when a movie about Arjun comes along, one looks forward to the opportunity to relive some of those stories. Directed by Arnab Chaudhuri, “Arjun – The Warrior Prince” tells the story of the Mahabharat from the point of view of Arjun, the third of the Pandava brothers.

May 20, 2012

A Minute With: Anurag Kashyap

MUMBAI (Reuters) – He’s been called the “best film school” in India and film-maker Anurag Kashyap is living up to his name.

His co-production “Udaan” made it to the Cannes film festival in 2010. This year, three films Kashyap is associated with — his own two-part revenge saga “Gangs of Wasseypur” and “Peddlers” (directed by Vasan Bala) — are being screened at Cannes.

May 18, 2012
via India Masala

Department: Mr Varma, please spare us the trauma

Photo

In my head, I always imagine Ram Gopal Varma, sitting in his office, legs up on the table, going through a checklist on the last day of a film shoot. Hyperactive camera angle – check. Lots of fake blood – check. Added some element of “Satya”, “Company” or “Sarkar” to the film – check. Leading ladies showing off cleavage – check.

How else do you explain a film like “Department”? That someone (Varma) thought they could make a film with such tacky production values, a convoluted and weak script, and some scenes that could be straight out of a soft-porn flick, and still convince a major studio to fund it and market it as a A-grade movie, is baffling.

    • About Shilpa

      "Shilpa covers Bollywood and entertainment for Reuters India since 2008. She has previously worked with DNA and the Press Trust of India, covering train blasts in Mumbai, a constitutional crisis in Goa and protests in New Delhi. On Twitter, she's @shilpajay."
    • More from Shilpa

    • Follow Shilpa