Shop Talk

Retailers, consumers and prices

Is Starbucks’ Vivanno the next Frappuccino?

July 11, 2008

vivanno1.JPGStarbucks stores around the United States are quietly preparing to roll out a new line of smoothies, called Vivanno, next week.

Some stores have even started a countdown for customers. In at least four coffee shops in Los Angeles and Chicago on Friday, chalkboards announced that Vivanno Nourishing Blends smoothies would be available in just four days.

vivanno21.JPGStarbucks officials wouldn’t say anything more about the smoothies, but the in-store signs pretty much said it all, including that the drinks would come in orange-mango-banana and banana-chocolate flavors.

Could Vivanno be the breath of fresh air Starbucks needs to turn itself around? In 10 years, will “Vivanno” be as iconic a word as “Frappuccino?”

You’ve got four days to mull that over before you can taste them for yourself.

Comments

It is interesting to hear people talking about how they can’t have caffeine-but they are still consuming it. What people don’t realize is that there is still caffeine in a decaffinated drink-it just has less in it. Therefore, it isn’t so much a question of not taking it in, but limiting it.
Still, I understand the desire to limit the intake-especially in the late afternoon. It’s bad when you need a frap fix and ending up staying up all night because of it!

Posted by Jess | Report as abusive
 

The Vivanno is vile. It tastes like a nasty egg, and is a bit chalky. It is not worth the nutritional benefits…and it is definetly not the “new frappuccino.” If you are a brave soul and are willing to try, then I salute you, my friend!

Posted by Liz | Report as abusive
 

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