Shop Talk

Retailers, consumers and prices

They lust for Leiber and buy Coach

September 3, 2008

leiber.jpgWhen it comes to luxury handbags , wealthy American women view Leiber bags as the most prestigious,  but most often buy Coach, according to a survey released on Wednesday.

The survey, conducted by a research firm called The Luxury Institute, found Leiber scored highest on its “Luxury Brand Status Index”, which includes measurements for quality, exclusivity, social status and self-enhancement (meaning the brand can make the buyer feel special).

Tied for second out of thirty luxury brands included in the survey were Hermes and Tod’s, followed by Jimmy Choo, Bottega Veneta and Valentino.

While those brands scored the highest in terms of perception, here are the brands that survey respondents said they purchased most frequently in the past 12 months.

Coach was far and away the bag purchased most frequently, according to 25.7 percent of respondents, according to the survey. A distant second and third were Kate Spade, with 4.6 percent, and Gucci, with 4.1 percent.

Coach was also the bag the biggest number of respondents (27.4 percent) said they would buy the next time they purchased a bag, followed by Kate Spade and Louis Vuitton.

Wonder if that has to do with the brand’s familiarity? When asked “which of the following brands are you familiar with”, 74 percent of the survey’s more than 1,000 women with annual incomes over $150,000 said they knew of Coach.

Compare that with only 11 percent for Tod’s and 10 percent for Leiber.

It looks like exclusivity really does lead to prestige.

(Photo: From Leiber website: “Exotically styled bag made of crocodile with magnetic flap closure and Austrian crystal trim” $5995.00)

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