Shop Talk

Retailers, consumers and prices

Wal-Mart’s Black Koi aims to suit Asian shoppers

October 14, 2008

wmthq.jpgIn Wal-Mart’s rocky attempts to sell trendy clothes a couple years ago it learned some very important lessons — one being that it is difficult to sell a huge volume of skinny jeans to your shoppers when analysts say the average American woman wears a size 12 to 14. 

Since its fashion foray fumble, Wal-Mart has since gone back to the drawing board and is now trying to tailor its stores to meet local demand. 

In Canada, that means Wal-Mart has decided to launch Black Koi, what it calls “the company’s first line of women’s apparel designed specifically for petite Asian customers.” 

The Black Koi collection includes dresses, jackets, shirts and skirts, and is designed “to fit petite customers, 5′ 3″ or under, with tailoring suited specifically to Asian body types.”

Wal-Mart said its merchants have looked at AC Nielsen and census data to identify multicultural population clusters around stores. Some of its Canadian stores already carry Asian food and housewares, while signage is shown in English and Chinese.

The Black Koi line, available in 16 of its stores, comes after Wal-Mart said customer response to its Bollywood Signature line of clothing targeted at South Asian women was so positive, it launched a follow-up collection this fall.

(Photo: Reuters) 

Comments

My only issue is that they’re specifically targeting an “Asian body type” rather than a “slimmer body type.” I’ve seen the size charts and they are pretty much in line with standard petite sizes.

Posted by writergal | Report as abusive
 

I am looking forward to this line. It’s so hard to find clothes that fit petite women in North America. I am glad that Walmart is adding a line.

Cheers!

Oliva
thecheapgirl.com

 

Post Your Comment

We welcome comments that advance the story through relevant opinion, anecdotes, links and data. If you see a comment that you believe is irrelevant or inappropriate, you can flag it to our editors by using the report abuse links. Views expressed in the comments do not represent those of Reuters. For more information on our comment policy, see http://blogs.reuters.com/fulldisclosure/2010/09/27/toward-a-more-thoughtful-conversation-on-stories/
  •