Shop Talk

Retailers, consumers and prices

Professor Lee Scott?

January 26, 2009

Could Lee Scott be heading off to Stanford?WALMART/CHINA

Scott will retire as CEO of the world’s largest retailer as of Feb. 1.

While Scott will remain chairman of the executive committee of the board after retiring as CEO, he gave a hint on Monday as to how he might spend some of his upcoming free time.

Speaking at a Wal-Mart meeting that was broadcast over the Internet, Scott said he has been asked by Stanford to be a visiting professor.

“It’s interesting being invited to be a visiting professor there because they sure as heck wouldn’t have let me in when I was younger, I guarantee you that,” Scott joked at the meeting.

According to a bio on Wal-Mart’s website, Scott received his Bachelor of Science degree in Business from Pittsburg State in Pittsburg, Kansas.

Reuters put a call in to Stanford. At the time this blog was published, the University was still working to confirm the invitation had been extended to Scott.

UPDATE:

Stanford got back to Reuters with an update.

Turns out, the Stanford Graduate School of Business has talked with Scott about the being a Denning Distinguished Fellow in Global Business and the Economy.

“I would be delighted if Lee can spend time at the Stanford Graduate School of Business, interacting with our students and faculty,” said Dean Robert L. Joss, in a statement provided to Reuters.

The school said talks are continuing.

(Photo: Reuters)

Comments

Hi Nicole – Seems to me that of anyone in retail, Lee Scott is one of the guys I’d most want to be able to chat with as a graduate student in business. Wal-Mart has been through the gamut: the good, the bad and the ugly, finally redeeming themselves when no one (including me) thought they could do it. There are lots of lessons to be learned from him, if he’s willing to spill his guts!

 

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