Shop Talk

Retailers, consumers and prices

There’s a new kid on the apparel block

June 19, 2009

By Nivedita Bhattacharjee 
 
ps web site
Before they decide what to wear back to school this fall, Aeropostale is giving young trendsters a new door to explore.
 
The company, whose stylized “A” graces the T-shirts of many American teenagers, opened its first “P.S. from Aeropostale” store in the Palisades Mall in West Nyack, New York. 
 
With a theme that says “Happy. Fun. Cool”, P.S from Aeropostale sells clothes aimed at boys and girls from 7 to 12.
 
“We are thrilled to be able to offer the elementary school student a brand they can call their own,” CEO Julian Geiger said in a statement. 
 
The retailer, which has taken market share from rivals as teens and their parents go bargain-hunting, had announced plans to enter the kids’ market in March.  About nine more of the stores are slated to open this fiscal year, mainly in the New York area.
 
“While it is very obvious from the logo and the looks that P.S. is part of Aeropostale, the chain has a vibe all its own,” Brean Murray analyst Eric Beder said in a note.  He added that while Aeropostale itself is almost all logo driven, the level of logo wear is lesser in the new chain.  Still, there are plenty of “P.S.” items to be found on the shop’s site.
 
“We believe this store will easily suit the needs of the younger girl/boy Aero ‘wanna-be,’” Beder said.
 
And with touches like places for moms to relax, and a system that allows them to talk to the kids while they are in the dressing room, Beder has already marked P.S. for Aeropostale the next big thing for the company.
 
Will the kids and their moms second that?
 
  
(Screen shot of P.S. web site www.ps4u.com)

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